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[OC] The Best MLS Player from Each Country That's Fielded One: Part 1 (UEFA)

Throughout its first 25 years, Major League Soccer has seen players from all different corners of the globe, each with their own career story. Whether it be a guy like Tim Melia or Chris Wondolowski who were scrappy guys that came out of nowhere to be stars in this league, or world famous names such as Zlatan, Beckham, and Henry, the league's history of big names is as diverse as they come.
Let's take a look at the best player from each country around the globe. This will be based on national team allegiance. Today, we'll be leading with Europe!
Please note that this is my opinion, and in some cases the decisions were tough; I'll be sure to add in honorable mentions where I can, or add notes.
Albania: Shkëlzen Gashi ( COL 2016-18)
Short list to pick from here, as Gashi's only competition is Jahmir Hyka and Hamdi Salihi. Gashi gets the nod, if nothing else, for his huge 2016 season, where he scored 10 regular season goals (one of which was that year's Goal of the Year) as the Rapids damn near won the Shield. The madlad then went and one-upped that with his absurd equalizer in the playoffs against the Galaxy.
His last two years weren't as fruitful, but man, when he was on he could pull something out of nowhere.
Armenia: Yura Movsisyan ( KC 2006-07, RSL 2007-09 & 2016-18, CHI 2018)
Four choices here, although in the end it's Movsisyan winning out over Harut Karapetyan, who played a couple seasons in the 90s for the Galaxy, San Jose, and Tampa Bay. The fourth pick in a strong 2006 MLS SuperDraft out of Pasadena City College, Movsisyan is mostly associated with RSL, who acquired him in a 2007 trade. With the Claret and Cobalt, he would tally 15 goals in 53 regular season appearances, and in 2009 he'd hoist the club's first MLS Cup. That'd be his last game with RSL until 2016 after some time in Europe with Randers, Krasnodar, and Spartak Moscow (even sharing the Russian PL Golden Boot in 2012/13 with Wanderson). He'd put up a similar clip of 16 in 57 before being waived and finishing his MLS career with four scoreless games with Chicago.
Austria: Daniel Royer ( NYRB 2016-pres.)
The choice here was largely Royer vs. Andreas Ivanschitz, who was a regular starter for Seattle's first MLS Cup, but I can't say no to a man with over 100 MLS matches played and three straight 10-goal seasons. In all comps, the former Austria Vienna man is just two goals behind Thierry Henry for third on the Red Bulls' all time goal scoring list.
Belarus: Sasha Gotsmanov ( COL 2005)
Gotsmanov qualifies by default as the only Belarusian player in MLS history. The Minsk native (and son of former Soviet and Belarusian international Sergei Gotsmanov) played one (1) single game for Colorado in October 2005, against RSL.
Belgium: Laurent Ciman ( MTL 2015-17, LAFC 2018, TFC 2019-pres.)
Shouts to Roland Lamah, who had his moments in Dallas, and Jelle van Damme, who played a season and a half for the Galaxy, but Ciman is the obvious choice. While he's fallen off a cliff as he's gotten older, he's a three-time All-Star and won Defender of the Year in his first MLS season; in his second, he played for Belgium at Euro 2016. At 35, he's lost a step and probably should only be used in emergencies, but at his best he was an elite MLS center back that could also be deployed at right back.
Bosnia & Herzegovina: Haris Medunjanin ( PHI 2017-19, CIN 2020-pres.)
The first one where I'm not totally confident in my pick, as Baggio Hušidić made this tricky (and as a Union fan I'm afraid of bias). But at his best, Haris is an assist machine (30 in four MLS seasons so far), and a threat on set pieces; the madlad even scored an Olimpico this year. His left foot is probably the best the Union have ever had. While his commitment to defense was nonexistent, give him the ball and he could spray a pass anywhere.
Bulgaria: Hristo Stoichkov ( CHI 2000-02, DC 2003)
One of three former Ballon d'Or winners to play in MLS (the others being Lothar Matthaus and Kaka, although "playing" is generous for the former), Stoichkov spent the last four seasons of his career in MLS, scoring 22 goals in 72 regular season matches for Chicago and DC. In his first season, a 9 goal in 18 match outing for the Fire, he also won the US Open Cup, scoring the opening goal of the final, a 2-1 win over Miami. (The winning goal, by the way, was scored by our old friend Owen Goal.)
Croatia: Damir Kreilach ( RSL 2018-pres.)
Mr. Miyagi's favorite MLS player for his crane kick equalizer in the playoffs, the former Rijeka and Union Berlin man has proven to be an excellent utility piece and core part of RSL throughout his time there, scoring 26 goals and chipping in 14 assists in 86 regular season matches and playing all over the damn place (naturally a central midfielder, he's probably still RSL's best forward). At 31, he still has a lot to give.
MLS has seen a huge influx of Croats lately, though; before Kreilach's 2018 signing there had only been four Croatian players in MLS history, two of whom barely played. Currently, there are five on active rosters.
Czechia: Luboš Kubík ( CHI 1998-2001, DAL 2001)
Czech players have had a good hit rate in MLS. In his lone MLS season, Bořek Dočkal led the league in assists, and Zdeněk Ondrášek was a very solid piece for Dallas, albeit one whose MLS time was brief.
But no. We have to go with Kubik. The sweeper was Best XI twice, in 1998 and 1999, and won Defender of the Year in 1998 helping Chicago to a MLS Cup-Open Cup double. He'd win another Open Cup two years later, before being traded to Dallas in 2001 and retiring due to injury.
So many lethal counterattacks started on the foot of this man, and he is rightfully seen as one of the greatest defenders the league has ever seen.
Denmark: Jimmy Nielsen ( KC 2010-13)
I debated going WAYYYYYYY off the board here and throwing out Miklos Molnar. His time in MLS was brief, just the 2000 season before he retired, but the man was the best attacking piece on a Cup winner. He could have balled out if he didn't retire early.
But nah. We're going with Casino Jimmy, one of the keys towards Kansas City's early 2010s turnaround. A two time All-Star, Nielsen was Goalkeeper of the Year in 2012, a year that also saw him win the Open Cup with the Wiz (on penalties, because KC and penalties, name a more iconic duo at this point). In 2013, he capped off his career by winning MLS Cup, again on penalties, while playing with broken ribs.
England: Bradley Wright-Phillips ( 2013-2019, LAFC 2020)
This league, man.
The list of English players to have represented in MLS is a long one, full of iconic names. Ashley Cole. David Beckham. Frank Lampard. Steven Gerrard. Jermain Defoe. Wayne Rooney. Hell, even Bradley's brother Shaun.
But nope. Many of those guys are the butt of many MLS jokes. BWP, on the other hand, is one of the greatest goal scorers the league has ever seen, with two Golden Boots to his name and well over a century of league goals. He was a part of 3 Shield winning teams, and made CONCACAF's Best XI in 2018.
And it all started with a quiet trial in 2013 after Charlton dumped him. This. League.
And This. Man. Even as a fan of Philly who doesn't care much for the Red Bulls, I respect this dude and everything he's done. I hope he gets another year after winning Comeback Player of the Year this year.
Estonia: Joel Lindpere ( NYRB 2010-12, CHI 2013)
The only other option here was Erik Sorga, who could dethrone Lindpere as he came to MLS at a very young age. But it's unlikely, as Lindpere was quietly very solid for the Red Bulls during his time. The Tallinn native was a two-time All-Star, and in 2010 he was named the Red Bulls' team MVP.
Finland: Alex Ring ( NYC 2017-2020, AUS pres.)
T O P I C A L
There's a few fairly talented Finns in MLS right now that could make this interesting (I really like Robin Lod's game, and Lassi Lappelainen would be excellent for Montreal if he'd stop getting hurt). Ring however has proven his worth across 4 seasons, including time as NYC's captain. Over 10,000 MLS minutes, mostly for good teams, as a defensive anchor, he will be a fantastic tone-setter for the new Austin team.
France: Thierry Henry ( NYRB 2010-14)
Oh man, as an Ireland fan I wanted to give this to literally anyone else. I am still bitter, dammit.
His best competition is probably Aurelien Collin, who has a closetful of trophies (including a Best XI and MLS Cup MVP). But no...it's Henry.
When a big name comes to MLS, what people want to see is someone who treats the league with respect. Henry did that. Not only was he dominant on the pitch, a three-time Best XI nomination, he also respected the history of the club he played for and gave 100%, even though he was getting up there in the years. He's a Red Bulls and MLS legend...as much as I curse that godforsaken hand
Georgia: Valeri "Vako" Qazaishvili ( SJ 2017-20)
It looks like the San Jose chapter of Vako's career is done and dusted. While the former Vitesse man struggled for consistency, he did put up 26 goals and 13 assists across four MLS seasons for the Quakes, including 10 while being coached by Mikael Stahre, which should probably get him and Wondo some sort of award.
We'll see what's next for him, if he leaves MLS or goes back to Europe. His only competition was Quakes teammate Guram Kashia.
Germany: Bastian Schweinsteiger ( CHI 2017-19)
I'm...actually not sure about this one. I actually changed this while writing, as I very nearly chose Julian Gressel; the former Rookie of the Year has two 10-assist seasons under his belt, and Kai Wagner has also been one of the league's better fullbacks for Philadelphia; Schweinsteiger was solid enough for Chicago in his advanced age for some very frustrating teams (and even moved positions to center back!)...but man, I don't know.
Germany is weird. For a country with such a great footballing tradition, the pickings are fairly slim. Arne Friedrich had one good year for Chicago before injuries claimed his career. Lottar Matthaus was as committed to this league as Schalke are to winning football matches. Stefan Aigner was stifled by Anthony Hudson going galaxy brain. Torsten Frings...existed.
I dunno.
Greece: Alexandros Tabakis ( ATL 2017)
The only Greek in MLS history...and our second one game wonder. Atlanta's FOURTH string keeper in 2017, he managed to sneak into a game against Minnesota with Brad Guzan on international duty, Alec Kann injured, and Kyle Reynish sent off during the match.
Atlanta lost 3-2. He's now in USL.
Hungary: Nemanja Nikolić ( CHI 2017-19)
Dániel Sallói and Krisztián Németh had their moments, but the winner is Nikolić, who came to MLS from the Ekstraklasa and immediately won the Golden Boot. His totals diminished in the three seasons he spent with Chicago, but 51 goals in 96 appearances isn't too shabby at all - it's second in Fire history behind Ante Razov.
Iceland - Guðmundur Þórarinsson ( NYC 2020-pres.)
Not much choice, 3 guys, all of whom were mostly bench guys. I almost went with Kristinn Steindorsson here on the merits of "he didn't have a penalty saved by Rodrigo Schlegel."
Israel: Gadi Kinda ( SKC 2020-pres.)
It was either him or Dedi Ben Dayan, really. And I nearly went with the former Colorado left back, but nah, Kinda is very much the superior player. The midfielder born in Ethiopia, Kinda shone brightly in his first season in KC, with 6 goals and 4 assists in his debut season. He'll be a DP next season.
Italy: Sebastian Giovinco ( TOR 2015-18)
A signing that changed an entire club.
Before Giovinco, the Reds were a laughingstock. He came in, won a Golden Boot and MVP right away, led the league in assists, made Best XI three years in a row, led them to their first playoff game, their first MLS Cup final, their first MLS Cup win, and a historic treble. And they damn near won CCL too.
The Atomic Ant was must-see from Day 1. It's not just because of him that Toronto is now one of MLS's elite...but he was a huge part of changing that culture. 83 goals in 142 games in all comps. And he dished out his fair share of assists too, with a telepathic partnership with Jozy.
Latvia: Raivis Hščanovičs ( TOR 2010)
Not much to write about here. 14 games for a bad Reds team. Gets in by default with no other Latvian MLS players.
Liechtenstein: Nicholas Hasler ( TOR 2017-18, CHI 2018-19, SKC 2019)
Another one by default. 66 games as a utilityman. Won MLS Cup and the Shield, though.
Lithuania: Vytautas Andriuškevičius ( POR 2016-18, DC 2018)
Only other choice was Edgaras Jankauskas, a forward who played 14 games for the Revs. Vytas played 37 for Portland and zero for DC.
Luxembourg: Maxime Chanot ( NYC 2016-pres.)
Another one by default but this one's an actually really solid player that finished fourth in Defender of the Year voting in 2019. We take those.
Malta: Etienne Barbera ( VAN 2012)
2 games in 2012. Only Maltese player in MLS.
Montenegro: Branko Bošković ( DC 2010-12)
Pretty much every other Montenegrin player played less than 20 games in MLS. Bošković played 43 before returning to Europe for family reasons. 7 assists in his final season though, which is technically something.
Netherlands: Johan Kappelhof ( CHI 2016-pres.)
Much like Germany, bright footballing tradition, very shaky MLS history. Which is weird because the Eredivisie exports a lot of guys to MLS.
Also, I'm excluding Kelvin Leerdam, as he is probably changing his international allegiance to Suriname.
So I'm going with 2017 All-Star Kappelhof, who I think is still fairly solid.
But really the choices aren't great. Dave van den Burgh? Roland Alberg scored a hat trick once I guess? Danny Koevermans was decent but injured all the time?
Maybe it's a hot take. It probably is.
North Macedonia: Oka Nikolov ( PHI 2013)
Never actually played, only in a friendly. Watch this space though as North Macedonia is apparently courting LAFC's Danny Musovski.
Northern Ireland: Johnny Steele ( RSL 2012, NYRB 2013-14)
Another case of shaky opposition, it was either Steele or Steve Morrow, who played 41 games for Dallas in the aughts.
Steele played regularly for a Shield winner, the 2013 Red Bulls. Easy peasy.
Norway: Vadim Demidov Ola Kamara ( CLB 2016-17, LAG 2018, DC 2019-pres.)
Adama Diomande is the main competition here. Kamara's first stint in MLS was a smashing success, scoring 48 goals in 90 regular season matches for Columbus and the Galaxy (he was traded for Gyasi Zardes before 2018). A brief foray to China followed, and while he's back in MLS with DC he hasn't quite been the same.
Still a good player on his day, maybe just the Bennyball effect.
Poland: Piotr Nowak ( CHI 1998-2002)
When I think of early Chicago, Nowak and the earlier-mentioned Kubik are the first two names that come to mind. Kubik held down the back while Nowak was the chief creator in the midfield. Three-time best XI, three-time All-Star, and MLS Cup MVP.
...can I drink my water now?
Portugal: José Gonçalves ( NE 2013-16)
Gonçalves fell off a cliff in his latter years, but in his first MLS season he won Defender of the Year and in his second he was a key part of a team that made the MLS Cup final and damn near won the thing.
Runner up here is Nani who is probably closing in.
EDIT: I also forgot to mention Pedro Santos, thanks to the Crew fans who pointed that one out. I still think Gonçalves pips him for his 2013 if nothing else, but Santos is probably closer than Nani.
Republic of Ireland: Robbie Keane ( LAG 2011-16)
A LOT closer than you think; Time Person of the Century Juventus legend Ronnie O'Brien was two-time best XI himself.
But nonono. This is Robbie freaking Keane. When we see these big name Euro guys interested in MLS, this is the man we want them to be.
Hypercompetitive and holding guys accountable on and off the pitch, and scoring for fun. 83 goals in 125 MLS regular season appearances. Best XI four times. 2014 MVP. MLS Cup MVP in 2014. A closetful of team awards including 3 MLS Cups.
This man was a baller, and frankly his departure was the beginning of the Galaxy decline into irrelevance, but that's a story for another time.
Romania: Alexandru Mitriță ( NYC 2019-pres.?)
Question mark because he's on loan and I have no idea if it'll be permanent, but he was punted out by the Pigeons just as he was really starting to break out. He scored 12 goals in his debut season last year but filled in nicely this year while Maxi Moralez was injured. EDIT: NYC fans have informed me he wasn't punted out, but was loaned out to be closer to his pregnant wife. My apologies.
Honorable mention: Alex Zotincă, who played for the Wizards and Chivas USA in the aughts. Brave man.
Russia: Igor Simutenkov ( KC 2002-04)
Not a lot to pick from here either. 49 games, 12 goals for this forward from Moscow, who now serves as an assistant coach at Zenit.
Scotland: John Spencer ( COL, 2001-04)
Give Johnny Russell another few years and he'll pass Spencer, but for now I'm leaning the latter. Spencer as a coach was frustrating as hell, but as a player he was Best XI twice and an MVP finalist once. Dude could score goals despite battling injuries in his time in MLS.
Just don't let him sign Kris Boyd. Then you lose to Cal FC. No one wants that.
Serbia: Aleksandar Katai ( 2018-19, 2020)
FROM A SPORTING PERSPECTIVE.
And mostly due to a weak pool. Runner up was probably someone like Miloš Kocić.
18 goals in 62 games for Chicago before getting yeeted back to Serbia for Bad People Reasons
Slovakia: Albert Rusnák ( RSL 2017-pres.)
He has tenure on Ján Greguš, who's the closest competitor, but Rusnák is also good. He followed up a 14-assist debut season (4th in the league) with back to back 10 goal seasons before struggling this year with injury.
Slovenia: Robert Berić ( CHI 2020-pres.)
Once he got acclimated to MLS, the goals came, and Chicago has its successor to Nikolić up top. He finished with 12 goals in his debut season, tied for second in the league with Ruidiaz and Zardes.
Also, from what I saw early on, seems like he's a dark-arts type of guy that gets in your head. That's fun.
Spain: David Villa ( NYC 2015-18)
I really didn't want to put him here due to recent allegations, and the fact that Pozuelo has already matched his MVP and two Best XI performances....
77 goals in 117 games though, that's tough to pass on.
Sweden: Zlatan Ibrahimović ( LAG 2018-19)
It's Zlatan.
He pretty much dragged a sorry LA organization to something resembling competitiveness.
What the hell did you expect?
(Anton Tinnerholm made this hard, though)
EDIT: Forgot Gustav Svensson as well in my honorable mentions.
Switzerland: Stefan Frei ( TOR 2009-13, SEA 2014-pres.)
Pretty self-explanatory, one of the most accomplished keepers in MLS history and with a closetful of hardware. And all it took Seattle to get him was a late first round pick that pinged around so much that it was eventually traded for a coach.
Turkey: Sercan Güvenışık ( SJ 2012)
5 games that year. No one else has flown the Turkish flag in MLS.
Ukraine: Dema Kovalenko ( CHI 1999-2002, DC 2002-05, NYRB 2006-08, RSL 2008, LAG 2008-10)
I'm afraid he'd break my legs if I didn't. One of the most physical and downright dirty players the league has ever seen. Made nearly 300 appearances though, and has one each of the 3 major US trophies (MLS Cup, USOC, Shield), all with a different team.
Wales: Andy Dorman ( NE 2004-07, 2013-15)
Dorman was a key part of that real good Revs team from the mid-aughts, and just beats out Carl Robinson. He made 112 appearances in his first stint, and played in 3 MLS Cup finals, though they famously lost all three. The Revs brought him back in 2013 after some time in Scotland and England, and was playing semipro in the area as recently as 2018.
submitted by LocksTheFox to MLS [link] [comments]

S04E19 Gopher It Discussion

Synopsis: Mayor Fitzy (Cavan Cunningham) is up for re-election (unopposed)and asks citizens for ideas on how to increase tourism in Dog River. Hank has an idea, and after thinking about it for a moment upon Lacey’s request, he suggests putting statues of prairie dogs around town and having locals paint them. His idea quickly spirals into debates of which size prairie dogs to paint, and if they should be gophers instead. The painted prairie dogs get the attention of Lacey’s sister, who works for Canada AM. They interview Hank, Wanda, and Emma. Oscar wants to have a casino in Dog River, and floats his idea to everyone around town. Fitzy tells him to “shut up” and Emma gets riled up. She decides to run for mayor. Davis is loyal to Fitzy and tries to intimidate Emma, but Karen is having none of it. Brent and Lacey are approached by the chain Pump N Go to sell Corner Gas and The Ruby. They sell, and Lacey decides to move back to Toronto and open a restaurant.
Feel free to comment on what you liked or didn’t, jokes, behind the scenes trivia, and any other discussion related to this episode.
Please also give a rating out of 5 chili dogs (0/5 being garbage for Hank to pick up, 5/5 being as good as Davis’s pierogis).
submitted by lostinaparkingspace to CornerGas [link] [comments]

Destiny your critiques of houses is so wrong

I was just watching your video essay and couldn't believe how uneducated your takes are.
Here are 15 books on 20th-century urban housing architectures, please educate yourself on how actually critique urban housing and I might give you a chance to debate me (make sure to bring a Ph.D. student in 20th century Nebraska housing).
submitted by kkawabat to Destiny [link] [comments]

Phantom

There’s an old impound lot, way on the east end of Toronto. It’s in an older, more run down part of town. There’s nothing much to see there, not usually at least. There’s a lot of cars sitting and waiting for their owners to come and get them. They sit in a gravel parking lot behind a chain link fence and a locking gate with barbed wire up at the top. There’s only one way in or out and that’s past the office and there’s no way that gate is going to open unless Old Sam or me go out to open it.

I don’t pay much attention to the cars that come and go and I don’t care about why they’re there or how unfair it is. All I really care about is that I get paid and I get the feeling that that’s what Old Sam cares about too. I’ve got bills to pay, and my girlfriend and I are saving up for a mortgage. I’ve been down at that lot for a number of years now and I’ve seen it all. I’ve heard all the excuses and this may sound a little rude but I genuinely do not fucking care. Pay your fine and leave. That’s how it works.

Like I said, we’re in a dumpy little part of town. It’s old but it has its charms. I grew up in this neighborhood and I know there’s a lotta hidden gems you can find if you give it the chance. Dumb luck put the impound lot right across the street from the best damn fish and chips in all of Toronto. Hell, probably all of Canada. It’s a neat little hole in the wall with a weird as hell name. ‘Harry's Golden Glowing Brothel & His Fish Wife’

The name must not put people off since his restaurant always seems full. Harry makes the best halibut I’ve ever tasted. Not too heavy on the batter, seasoned to perfection but not so much that you can’t taste the fish. Old Sam once said that people always come for the absurd name, and come back for the fish. I know he’s right. I also know that after they eat they wander past the Impound Lot for a glimpse at the Phantom.

Our little lot is unremarkable in every way but one. You see, we have one long term resident and that’s a 1925 Rolls-Royce Phantom. Old Sam keeps it locked behind the fence. God knows if it even runs anymore but it looks like it could. He’s probably spent more time taking care of that car than I’ve been alive.

It really is a beauty. The streamlined look makes it feel like something out of a comic book. The back of it trails off like a cape. The Phantom is pitch black with completely circular doors and a refined red interior. I’ve got no idea what, if anything is under the hood. Like I said, I don’t even know if it runs. Old Sam’s never taken it out of the lot. No one has. There’s a reason for that. I always took it as dumb superstition but I respected it nonetheless.

That reason was Mark Sinclair.

Nowadays, you won’t find much if you look him up. There’s an actor who used to go by that name, although he goes by something else now. I doubt there’s any relation and frankly it’s probably a good thing that Sinclair’s been almost lost to history.

Back in the day though, he was fierce. Nobody fucked with Mark Sinclair. Toronto was his town, and he ran it like a machine. The Phantom belonged to him. It was his pride and joy. When you saw that car coming, you got out of the way and hoped it passed you by. Nobody wanted to be on Sinclair’s radar.

This was all before my time of course, but I know he ran some old casinos and was the guy running the bad crowds. They say that even the American’s kept away from him though, until he got caught at least. Not sure who had the balls to go toe to toe with Sinclair. Like I said, information is scarce. But someone brought him down and his car ended up in the care of my little lot.

Normally, it would’ve been sold at auction. A beautiful car like the Phantom should’ve fetched a hefty price, even back then. Nowadays, you could slap a million dollar price tag on that baby and still find buyers. But the thing is, everyone knew it was Sinclair’s car. No one in their right mind wanted to buy Sinclair’s car because when he got out of jail, they knew that he was gonna want it back. Old Sam tells me that every time it came out for auction, no one ever dared to bid. No one was that stupid.

Eventually, they just stopped auctioning it and they weren’t dumb enough to try and sell it otherwise. The car stayed put and they even made a point to keep it in top shape so that when Sinclair came back, he could drive off like nothing had happened. Maybe he would’ve, if he hadn’t died in prison.

I wish I could tell you how the big bad Sinclair bit the big one, but Old Sam didn’t know how and so neither do I. Either way, Sinclair was never coming back. By then the owner of the lot was so used to the car that he just left it there. He may even have acquired legal ownership of it, which would make it Old Sam’s car now, since I assume he passed it down to him. Regardless of who owned it, the car stayed put on the lot. Not forgotten, but a relic of a man no one wanted to remember.

Old Sam and I liked to break for lunch and stop off at Harry’s whenever we got the chance. As I move into my mid thirties, I find I have less and less of an appetite for deep fried food but Harry’s is always an exception. That fish can do no wrong. Old Sam was looking a little pale. The past few months, I’d seen his age taking a toll on the man. I can’t say just how old he was but it was on the meaner side of 70. I’d heard the rasp in his voice as well and that cough he’d developed sounded nasty. He’d never out and say it but I could read between the lines. The old man was sick. Hell, maybe he was even dying. I was worried about him of course, but last time I’d tried to talk to him about his health I’d gotten an earful.
“I’ll work this lot ‘till I’m dead!” He’d snarled, spittle flying past his yellowed teeth and cracked lips. “You mind your own own damn business!”

So that’s what I did. It didn’t change the fact that I’d noticed he’d gotten worse. He was getting skinnier by the day and spent most of his time either alone in his office or departed to places unknown. I’d overheard a phone call he’d made once and words like: ‘Chemo’ and ‘Terminal’ had been mentioned. Specifically: “I don’t care if it’s terminal! I don’t want the chemo!”

I don’t know if it was dumb pride that kept him out of the hospital or what, but either way Old Sam was adamant on pretending nothing was wrong and going about his work like normal. It may sound cold to say, but I respected his choice as much as I could.

We were enjoying our lunch and making small talk just yesterday when I saw a man poking around the fence. Now, this wasn’t unusual. I knew what he was trying to do. He wanted to see the Phantom. Most people did. Even those ignorant of its history could still appreciate the beauty of the vehicle. This man looked different than the usual folks who passed by though. He wore a long black coat and a fedora, like he thought he was Humphrey Bogart. He moved past the fence slowly, stopping when he saw the Phantom.

Old Sam wasn’t looking at the man. He was drinking his beer and watching the hockey game on the TV behind me.
“Something on your mind?” He asked. He’d noticed me staring off into space.
“Nah, I’m fine,” I replied. “We got some interest in the Phantom.”

Old Sam snorted, then coughed. It was a wet, raspy sound.
“Son, folks’ve been interested in that car for the past eighty five years.” He said, before he looked back at the man by the fence. His back remained to us. Old Sam studied him for a few minutes before huffing and taking another swig of his beer. As he did, I saw the man in black turn his head to look at us, as if he knew we were there.

Old Sam and I stared back at him as he stuffed his hands into his pockets and crossed the street, headed towards the restaurant. We tracked him as he entered. He seemed to stand tall above everyone else, a massive black shape. His roman features looked like they’d been chiseled in stone. His eyes were ice cold and piercing. He looked at us. No need to search. He knew exactly where we were and he approached with a slow, methodical purpose in his step.

“Good afternoon.” He said as he reached us. His voice was deep but hoarse, as if he was terribly sick. There were two more chairs free at our table. He didn’t pull one out to sit down.
“Something we can help you with?” Old Sam asked. He spoke slowly with a wary tone.
“Perhaps. Do you mind if I sit?”

Old Sam gave him a nod and the man in black finally pulled out a chair for himself.
“Thank you. It’s been some time since I’ve been in this restaurant… Glad to see it’s still here.”
“Harry’s is a landmark. I’d be shocked if they ever closed.” Old Sam said.
“Well, time is unpredictable,” The man in black replied. “Sorry to disturb your lunch. I hate to be so rude, but allow me to introduce myself. My name is Ryan Caparzo. I was just passing by and saw that old Phantom. I’m a bit of a collector. I was wondering if it was for sale.”
“It’s an impound lot,” Old Sam said. “Nothing there is for sale.”
“Not until auction, of course,” Carpazo said. “Where the unclaimed things get sold. How long has that one been sitting there, though? Eighty, maybe ninety years? They really don’t make them like that anymore.”
“So I guess you’ll have to look hard to find a buyer.” Old Sam replied. Carpazo just smiled sheepishly.

“Are you sure? It’s been a while since I’ve been in town. I’m just getting back now from a very long absence. But I remember seeing it sitting in that lot, all those years ago... I have always wanted that car, and it’s only now that I have the money to buy it. A car like that deserves to be seen, it shouldn’t be sitting in some forgotten corner of Toronto gathering dust and rust. Name your price. I won’t take no for an answer.”
Old Sam huffed. It was a sound of both respect and disapproval.
“Well when you put it that way, I guess the car still isn’t for sale. Sorry. I can’t sell it to you. Not my place to do so.”

Carpazo just cracked a small, wry smile. He didn’t look angry. If anything, he just looked mildly amused.
“Well that’s it then,” He said. “Gotta admit, old man. I respect your commitment to your principles. I guess they don’t make ‘em like you anymore either.”

Before Old Sam could say anything in response a plate of halibut was set down in front of him, followed by one for me as well.
“Alrighty boys, lunch is served. Hope you enjoy!” Said the cheery waitress who’d been working there for longer than I’d been alive.
“Thanks.” Old Sam murmured and I did the same. Our waitress didn’t seem to notice Carpazo. I half expected her to ask him if there was anything he wanted. Then again, the lunch rush was in high gear. She was obviously busy.
“Well, I won’t keep you,” Carpazo said once she was gone. “Just think about it, alright? I’m very eager to take that old car off your hands.”

He smiled and tipped his hat towards us before pulling out of the chair and leaving just as suddenly as he’d arrived. Old Sam watched him go before shaking his head and digging into his fish.
“You didn’t even wanna hear the guys price?” I asked.
“There ain’t a price you can put on a car like that,” Old Sam replied. “Besides. I like it right where it is, thank you very much. Only man who’s ever owned that thing is Mark Sinclair and he’s the only man who ever will own it.”
“Last I checked, Sinclair’s been dead for a long time.”

Old Sam coughed. He lifted the napkin to cover his mouth. When he lowered it, I caught a glimpse of some red in there. He was quick to hide it from me.

“What are you getting at?”
I chose my words carefully. I didn’t want to start a fight. But I had a point to make.
“I’m just saying, when you go, the lot goes. Somebody’s willing to pay for that thing. Why not just let them have it?”
“A great number of reasons, thank you very much!” Old Sam growled. “You wouldn’t understand. You’re too young…”
“And you’re running out of time,” I said. He paused. His eyes darted over to me.
“I can tell you’re sick,” I said. “You’re not hiding it very well. How long’ve you got left?”
“Doesn’t matter.” Old Sam grunted.
“Months?” I asked. “Weeks? You’ve got kids and grandkids, don’t you? Look, I don’t wanna be blunt but they’re not taking over. Maybe it’s time to start packing it in. Sell the car, leave them some money.”

“They’ll get plenty already,” Old Sam said. “This ain’t a topic for discussion, son. The Phantom ain’t for sale.” His mind was made up. I’d said my piece and the death glare he was giving me made it clear that if I still wanted a job, I’d keep it to myself. I knew he wasn’t going to budge and it really wouldn’t have mattered to me either way if he sold the Phantom or kept it. I might’ve missed the old car, but not that much. To me, it was always just a car.

It was a few days later when Carpazo came into the office. It was late and we were supposed to be closing down soon. That didn’t seem to stop Carpazo though. I heard the door chime and looked up to see him standing in the doorway, a massive black shape that stared down at me with beady, blue eyes. I knew he recognized me and he smiled warmly as he approached my desk.
“Good evening,” He said in that smooth tone of his. “Sorry to bother you so late. I was wondering if the Old Man was in tonight.”
“He’s in the back office,” I said. “But I’m sure I can help you.”

I didn’t want any trouble, but I also didn’t want to disturb Old Sam. Carpazo flashed me that winning smile of his
“Well, maybe you can.” He said. He reached into his coat pocket and took out a very old bunch of folded papers.
“I came across this. Took me a bit of digging to find it. I think it should handle everything though.”

I looked down at the papers. Some of them were ancient and falling apart. They were browned with age and barely legible, but I did recognize it as the relevant paperwork to have a car released. The Phantom specifically.
“These can’t be real.” I said, setting the papers down on the desk.
“They are,” Carpazo insisted. “Look them over. Show them to the old man. This should authorize the car to be released to me.”
“Let’s say they are,” I replied. “How exactly did you get them?”
“That’s not a relevant question. Now either give me the car and I’ll take it off your hands or bring the Old Man in.”

His tone was strangely hostile. I raised an eyebrow, debating if it would be wise to argue with him or not. I looked into that man’s eyes and I knew there wasn’t a damn thing that was going to stand between him and the Phantom. Like I said before, it was just a car to me. Maybe it was something more to Old Sam, but it shouldn’t have been. I knew he didn’t have long left, and I realized that I didn’t care if he died hating me for it, but his family deserved a lot more than an abandoned impound lot.

I leaned in closer to Carpazo.“Look buddy. If we get Old Sam involved, this isn’t going to end well for you,” I said. “Chances are, he’ll rip these in half. He made his stance on the car pretty clear.”
“So he did,” Carpazo replied. “What about your stance?”
“Well truthfully, I don’t care one way or the other about the car,” I admitted. “But back at Harry’s, you said something about paying for it. Now, I’m not sure if you noticed but the Old Man isn’t doing so hot. This place isn’t exactly rolling in dough either. He can barely afford to pay me. Between you and me, I think he could use that money a lot more than he lets on.”

Carpazo smirked.
“Well if you’re looking to cut a deal, I can play ball. Name your price.”
From his pocket, he took out a yellowed checkbook and a fountain pen.
“What’s it worth to you?” I asked.
“Let’s start at a million and go from there.”

A million? Holy shit, that was not what I’d expected. My shock seemed to delight Carpazo but he waited patiently for me to speak. I struggled to find the words at first. It took me a while before I could say anything at all.
“Is two off the table?”
“Of course not. In fact, I’ll be generous. How does five sound? Takes care of the Old Man, his doting wife, son and grandchildren, and maybe a little extra for you if you feel like it.”

The idea was tempting… Enough so that I never questioned why Carpazo knew so much about Old Sam’s family.
“Five.” I said and watched as Carpazo cut the cheque. He looked at me before passing the paper over to me. Looking at it, it felt unreal. My heart began to race in my chest and as I reached for it, Carpazo pulled it out of my reach.

“Ah ah. Keys first.”
“Right…” I murmured. I turned and opened the cabinet behind me where we kept any keys we had for the vehicles. The one for the Phantom was easy to find. Old Sam had labeled it clearly. I took it off its hook and turned to offer it out to Carpazo.
He grinned as he took his hand off the cheque and reached out for the key.

“What the hell are you doing?” Old Sam asked from behind me. Carpazo looked at him, turning on his charm which fell flat against the old man. The hand holding the key jerked back, almost trying to hide it. No luck.
“I already told you. The Phantom’s not for sale!” Old Sam snapped. His eyes were fixated on me in a death glare.
“I’m not here to buy it. I’m here to have it released,” Carpazo said calmly. “I have the paperwork.”

“Paperwork? For an eighty five year old car? Like hell you do!” Old Sam snatched the papers off the table. He looked them up and down, a grimace on his face. I saw his look soften just a little bit before he locked eyes with Carpazo.
“Where the hell did you get these?”
“You can find anything if you know where to look,” Carpazo said. “If I can’t buy the car, I’ll take custody of it.”
“And just what interest is this car to you?” Old Sam demanded.
“It’s simple. I like it, I want it and I get what I want.” He said in a way that made it clear just how used he was to getting what he wanted.

Old Sam narrowed his eyes, then chuckled.
“Well, well… You’ve got balls, don’t you, you little shit. But I can’t let you touch that car.”
With that, he calmly tore the papers in two and for the first time I saw Carpazo’s eye twitch. It was just a small crack in his amicable mask but behind it I saw a seething rage. His eyes settled on the cheque next and he destroyed that next.
“What are you doing?!” I cried.
“The car stays here!” Old Sam said sternly. “Where it belongs, where you can’t touch it!”

I could see Carpazo almost quaking in his rage. I saw his fists clench and unclench. He smiled. There was nothing in it to give away his hidden fury, and yet that spoke volumes more than anything else.
“And you…” Old Sam looked at me now, his own rage apparent. “Selling that damned thing behind my back like a snake! You. You’re done here. Get out.”
“You need that money!” I tried to protest.
“Like hell I do! Give me the keys! Get out!”

He moved towards me. Carpazo’s eyes met mine. I was faster than Old Sam. I tossed the keys onto the counter and watched as Old Sam tried to grab them. Carpazo beat him to it. He snatched the keys up, a big shit eating grin on his face. Old Sam’s expression turned from one of rage to one of horror. He looked at me with quiet disbelief.
“No! NO! What did you do?”
“Your family needs that money!” I said. “It’s a stupid car!”
“No it’s not! It’s Sinclairs car!”
“Yes it is…” Carpazo said softly. He admired the keys in his hand, then looked at Old Sam, still smiling wryly. “And it’s so good to have it back.”
Back?

Carpazo turned towards the door as Old Sam tried to run after him. I tried to stop the old man but he’d moved faster than I’d ever seen him move. He tried to wrestle the keys from Carpazo but I watched as he was knocked aside. He fell towards the counter and his head cracked against it. He didn’t get up again. I rushed to Old Sam’s side but he was out like a light. I don’t know if the impact killed him, or if there was ever a chance that he could be saved. I suppose it didn’t matter either way.

Carpazo laughed humorlessly. He stood in the open door, the moonlight on his face and I looked up at him. Maybe I would’ve asked him ‘Why’. There were a lot of questions I wanted to ask but when I saw him standing in the doorway, all I could think about was the fact that he looked different than before… I couldn’t say how. But now I recognized him. Not as Carpazo. No. I was looking up into the pale face of Mark Sinclair.

“Sorry about the mess, kid… Five million, right? Don’t worry. I’ll get it to you. I always keep my word.”
He admired the key in his hand, smiling contentedly as he did.
“Now this… This I’ve been hoping to get for a long time. Didn’t think I’d ever get past the old man. You’ve done me a solid. You’re a good kid. Thanks for keeping an eye on her for me.”

With that, Sinclair winked and disappeared out the door.Moments later I heard the engine of the Phantom roar to life. It shot past the office and tore out onto the open road. The last I saw of it, were the taillights fading off into the distance.

I only told the Police what I knew they’d believe. Someone had come in, killed Old Sam and taken the Phantom. The rest, I chose to omit. Best not to try and explain what you don’t truly understand.

Right now I’m sitting in Harry’s, nursing a beer as I watch the Police do their work. I’ve given my statement. I’m sure they’ll draw their own conclusions… But I know what I saw. Somehow, Mark Sinclair came back for his car, and I don’t know if that’s a good thing. A little while ago, I heard that some Cops found the car. A little while later, a lot of Cops left in a hurry. I heard the words ‘officers down’. They took Sinclair’s car once. I don’t think he’ll let them take it again.
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Phantom

There’s an old impound lot, way on the east end of Toronto. It’s in an older, more run down part of town. There’s nothing much to see there, not usually at least. There’s a lot of cars sitting and waiting for their owners to come and get them. They sit in a gravel parking lot behind a chain link fence and a locking gate with barbed wire up at the top. There’s only one way in or out and that’s past the office and there’s no way that gate is going to open unless Old Sam or me go out to open it.

I don’t pay much attention to the cars that come and go and I don’t care about why they’re there or how unfair it is. All I really care about is that I get paid and I get the feeling that that’s what Old Sam cares about too. I’ve got bills to pay, and my girlfriend and I are saving up for a mortgage. I’ve been down at that lot for a number of years now and I’ve seen it all. I’ve heard all the excuses and this may sound a little rude but I genuinely do not fucking care. Pay your fine and leave. That’s how it works.

Like I said, we’re in a dumpy little part of town. It’s old but it has its charms. I grew up in this neighborhood and I know there’s a lotta hidden gems you can find if you give it the chance. Dumb luck put the impound lot right across the street from the best damn fish and chips in all of Toronto. Hell, probably all of Canada. It’s a neat little hole in the wall with a weird as hell name. ‘Harry's Golden Glowing Brothel & His Fish Wife’

The name must not put people off since his restaurant always seems full. Harry makes the best halibut I’ve ever tasted. Not too heavy on the batter, seasoned to perfection but not so much that you can’t taste the fish. Old Sam once said that people always come for the absurd name, and come back for the fish. I know he’s right. I also know that after they eat they wander past the Impound Lot for a glimpse at the Phantom.

Our little lot is unremarkable in every way but one. You see, we have one long term resident and that’s a 1925 Rolls-Royce Phantom. Old Sam keeps it locked behind the fence. God knows if it even runs anymore but it looks like it could. He’s probably spent more time taking care of that car than I’ve been alive.

It really is a beauty. The streamlined look makes it feel like something out of a comic book. The back of it trails off like a cape. The Phantom is pitch black with completely circular doors and a refined red interior. I’ve got no idea what, if anything is under the hood. Like I said, I don’t even know if it runs. Old Sam’s never taken it out of the lot. No one has. There’s a reason for that. I always took it as dumb superstition but I respected it nonetheless.

That reason was Mark Sinclair.

Nowadays, you won’t find much if you look him up. There’s an actor who used to go by that name, although he goes by something else now. I doubt there’s any relation and frankly it’s probably a good thing that Sinclair’s been almost lost to history.

Back in the day though, he was fierce. Nobody fucked with Mark Sinclair. Toronto was his town, and he ran it like a machine. The Phantom belonged to him. It was his pride and joy. When you saw that car coming, you got out of the way and hoped it passed you by. Nobody wanted to be on Sinclair’s radar.

This was all before my time of course, but I know he ran some old casinos and was the guy running the bad crowds. They say that even the American’s kept away from him though, until he got caught at least. Not sure who had the balls to go toe to toe with Sinclair. Like I said, information is scarce. But someone brought him down and his car ended up in the care of my little lot.

Normally, it would’ve been sold at auction. A beautiful car like the Phantom should’ve fetched a hefty price, even back then. Nowadays, you could slap a million dollar price tag on that baby and still find buyers. But the thing is, everyone knew it was Sinclair’s car. No one in their right mind wanted to buy Sinclair’s car because when he got out of jail, they knew that he was gonna want it back. Old Sam tells me that every time it came out for auction, no one ever dared to bid. No one was that stupid.

Eventually, they just stopped auctioning it and they weren’t dumb enough to try and sell it otherwise. The car stayed put and they even made a point to keep it in top shape so that when Sinclair came back, he could drive off like nothing had happened. Maybe he would’ve, if he hadn’t died in prison.

I wish I could tell you how the big bad Sinclair bit the big one, but Old Sam didn’t know how and so neither do I. Either way, Sinclair was never coming back. By then the owner of the lot was so used to the car that he just left it there. He may even have acquired legal ownership of it, which would make it Old Sam’s car now, since I assume he passed it down to him. Regardless of who owned it, the car stayed put on the lot. Not forgotten, but a relic of a man no one wanted to remember.

Old Sam and I liked to break for lunch and stop off at Harry’s whenever we got the chance. As I move into my mid thirties, I find I have less and less of an appetite for deep fried food but Harry’s is always an exception. That fish can do no wrong. Old Sam was looking a little pale. The past few months, I’d seen his age taking a toll on the man. I can’t say just how old he was but it was on the meaner side of 70. I’d heard the rasp in his voice as well and that cough he’d developed sounded nasty. He’d never out and say it but I could read between the lines. The old man was sick. Hell, maybe he was even dying. I was worried about him of course, but last time I’d tried to talk to him about his health I’d gotten an earful.
“I’ll work this lot ‘till I’m dead!” He’d snarled, spittle flying past his yellowed teeth and cracked lips. “You mind your own own damn business!”

So that’s what I did. It didn’t change the fact that I’d noticed he’d gotten worse. He was getting skinnier by the day and spent most of his time either alone in his office or departed to places unknown. I’d overheard a phone call he’d made once and words like: ‘Chemo’ and ‘Terminal’ had been mentioned. Specifically: “I don’t care if it’s terminal! I don’t want the chemo!”

I don’t know if it was dumb pride that kept him out of the hospital or what, but either way Old Sam was adamant on pretending nothing was wrong and going about his work like normal. It may sound cold to say, but I respected his choice as much as I could.

We were enjoying our lunch and making small talk just yesterday when I saw a man poking around the fence. Now, this wasn’t unusual. I knew what he was trying to do. He wanted to see the Phantom. Most people did. Even those ignorant of its history could still appreciate the beauty of the vehicle. This man looked different than the usual folks who passed by though. He wore a long black coat and a fedora, like he thought he was Humphrey Bogart. He moved past the fence slowly, stopping when he saw the Phantom.

Old Sam wasn’t looking at the man. He was drinking his beer and watching the hockey game on the TV behind me.
“Something on your mind?” He asked. He’d noticed me staring off into space.
“Nah, I’m fine,” I replied. “We got some interest in the Phantom.”

Old Sam snorted, then coughed. It was a wet, raspy sound.
“Son, folks’ve been interested in that car for the past eighty five years.” He said, before he looked back at the man by the fence. His back remained to us. Old Sam studied him for a few minutes before huffing and taking another swig of his beer. As he did, I saw the man in black turn his head to look at us, as if he knew we were there.

Old Sam and I stared back at him as he stuffed his hands into his pockets and crossed the street, headed towards the restaurant. We tracked him as he entered. He seemed to stand tall above everyone else, a massive black shape. His roman features looked like they’d been chiseled in stone. His eyes were ice cold and piercing. He looked at us. No need to search. He knew exactly where we were and he approached with a slow, methodical purpose in his step.

“Good afternoon.” He said as he reached us. His voice was deep but hoarse, as if he was terribly sick. There were two more chairs free at our table. He didn’t pull one out to sit down.
“Something we can help you with?” Old Sam asked. He spoke slowly with a wary tone.
“Perhaps. Do you mind if I sit?”

Old Sam gave him a nod and the man in black finally pulled out a chair for himself.
“Thank you. It’s been some time since I’ve been in this restaurant… Glad to see it’s still here.”
“Harry’s is a landmark. I’d be shocked if they ever closed.” Old Sam said.
“Well, time is unpredictable,” The man in black replied. “Sorry to disturb your lunch. I hate to be so rude, but allow me to introduce myself. My name is Ryan Caparzo. I was just passing by and saw that old Phantom. I’m a bit of a collector. I was wondering if it was for sale.”
“It’s an impound lot,” Old Sam said. “Nothing there is for sale.”
“Not until auction, of course,” Carpazo said. “Where the unclaimed things get sold. How long has that one been sitting there, though? Eighty, maybe ninety years? They really don’t make them like that anymore.”
“So I guess you’ll have to look hard to find a buyer.” Old Sam replied. Carpazo just smiled sheepishly.

“Are you sure? It’s been a while since I’ve been in town. I’m just getting back now from a very long absence. But I remember seeing it sitting in that lot, all those years ago... I have always wanted that car, and it’s only now that I have the money to buy it. A car like that deserves to be seen, it shouldn’t be sitting in some forgotten corner of Toronto gathering dust and rust. Name your price. I won’t take no for an answer.”
Old Sam huffed. It was a sound of both respect and disapproval.
“Well when you put it that way, I guess the car still isn’t for sale. Sorry. I can’t sell it to you. Not my place to do so.”

Carpazo just cracked a small, wry smile. He didn’t look angry. If anything, he just looked mildly amused.
“Well that’s it then,” He said. “Gotta admit, old man. I respect your commitment to your principles. I guess they don’t make ‘em like you anymore either.”

Before Old Sam could say anything in response a plate of halibut was set down in front of him, followed by one for me as well.
“Alrighty boys, lunch is served. Hope you enjoy!” Said the cheery waitress who’d been working there for longer than I’d been alive.
“Thanks.” Old Sam murmured and I did the same. Our waitress didn’t seem to notice Carpazo. I half expected her to ask him if there was anything he wanted. Then again, the lunch rush was in high gear. She was obviously busy.
“Well, I won’t keep you,” Carpazo said once she was gone. “Just think about it, alright? I’m very eager to take that old car off your hands.”

He smiled and tipped his hat towards us before pulling out of the chair and leaving just as suddenly as he’d arrived. Old Sam watched him go before shaking his head and digging into his fish.
“You didn’t even wanna hear the guys price?” I asked.
“There ain’t a price you can put on a car like that,” Old Sam replied. “Besides. I like it right where it is, thank you very much. Only man who’s ever owned that thing is Mark Sinclair and he’s the only man who ever will own it.”
“Last I checked, Sinclair’s been dead for a long time.”

Old Sam coughed. He lifted the napkin to cover his mouth. When he lowered it, I caught a glimpse of some red in there. He was quick to hide it from me.

“What are you getting at?”
I chose my words carefully. I didn’t want to start a fight. But I had a point to make.
“I’m just saying, when you go, the lot goes. Somebody’s willing to pay for that thing. Why not just let them have it?”
“A great number of reasons, thank you very much!” Old Sam growled. “You wouldn’t understand. You’re too young…”
“And you’re running out of time,” I said. He paused. His eyes darted over to me.
“I can tell you’re sick,” I said. “You’re not hiding it very well. How long’ve you got left?”
“Doesn’t matter.” Old Sam grunted.
“Months?” I asked. “Weeks? You’ve got kids and grandkids, don’t you? Look, I don’t wanna be blunt but they’re not taking over. Maybe it’s time to start packing it in. Sell the car, leave them some money.”

“They’ll get plenty already,” Old Sam said. “This ain’t a topic for discussion, son. The Phantom ain’t for sale.” His mind was made up. I’d said my piece and the death glare he was giving me made it clear that if I still wanted a job, I’d keep it to myself. I knew he wasn’t going to budge and it really wouldn’t have mattered to me either way if he sold the Phantom or kept it. I might’ve missed the old car, but not that much. To me, it was always just a car.

It was a few days later when Carpazo came into the office. It was late and we were supposed to be closing down soon. That didn’t seem to stop Carpazo though. I heard the door chime and looked up to see him standing in the doorway, a massive black shape that stared down at me with beady, blue eyes. I knew he recognized me and he smiled warmly as he approached my desk.
“Good evening,” He said in that smooth tone of his. “Sorry to bother you so late. I was wondering if the Old Man was in tonight.”
“He’s in the back office,” I said. “But I’m sure I can help you.”

I didn’t want any trouble, but I also didn’t want to disturb Old Sam. Carpazo flashed me that winning smile of his
“Well, maybe you can.” He said. He reached into his coat pocket and took out a very old bunch of folded papers.
“I came across this. Took me a bit of digging to find it. I think it should handle everything though.”

I looked down at the papers. Some of them were ancient and falling apart. They were browned with age and barely legible, but I did recognize it as the relevant paperwork to have a car released. The Phantom specifically.
“These can’t be real.” I said, setting the papers down on the desk.
“They are,” Carpazo insisted. “Look them over. Show them to the old man. This should authorize the car to be released to me.”
“Let’s say they are,” I replied. “How exactly did you get them?”
“That’s not a relevant question. Now either give me the car and I’ll take it off your hands or bring the Old Man in.”

His tone was strangely hostile. I raised an eyebrow, debating if it would be wise to argue with him or not. I looked into that man’s eyes and I knew there wasn’t a damn thing that was going to stand between him and the Phantom. Like I said before, it was just a car to me. Maybe it was something more to Old Sam, but it shouldn’t have been. I knew he didn’t have long left, and I realized that I didn’t care if he died hating me for it, but his family deserved a lot more than an abandoned impound lot.

I leaned in closer to Carpazo.“Look buddy. If we get Old Sam involved, this isn’t going to end well for you,” I said. “Chances are, he’ll rip these in half. He made his stance on the car pretty clear.”
“So he did,” Carpazo replied. “What about your stance?”
“Well truthfully, I don’t care one way or the other about the car,” I admitted. “But back at Harry’s, you said something about paying for it. Now, I’m not sure if you noticed but the Old Man isn’t doing so hot. This place isn’t exactly rolling in dough either. He can barely afford to pay me. Between you and me, I think he could use that money a lot more than he lets on.”

Carpazo smirked.
“Well if you’re looking to cut a deal, I can play ball. Name your price.”
From his pocket, he took out a yellowed checkbook and a fountain pen.
“What’s it worth to you?” I asked.
“Let’s start at a million and go from there.”

A million? Holy shit, that was not what I’d expected. My shock seemed to delight Carpazo but he waited patiently for me to speak. I struggled to find the words at first. It took me a while before I could say anything at all.
“Is two off the table?”
“Of course not. In fact, I’ll be generous. How does five sound? Takes care of the Old Man, his doting wife, son and grandchildren, and maybe a little extra for you if you feel like it.”

The idea was tempting… Enough so that I never questioned why Carpazo knew so much about Old Sam’s family.
“Five.” I said and watched as Carpazo cut the cheque. He looked at me before passing the paper over to me. Looking at it, it felt unreal. My heart began to race in my chest and as I reached for it, Carpazo pulled it out of my reach.

“Ah ah. Keys first.”
“Right…” I murmured. I turned and opened the cabinet behind me where we kept any keys we had for the vehicles. The one for the Phantom was easy to find. Old Sam had labeled it clearly. I took it off its hook and turned to offer it out to Carpazo.
He grinned as he took his hand off the cheque and reached out for the key.

“What the hell are you doing?” Old Sam asked from behind me. Carpazo looked at him, turning on his charm which fell flat against the old man. The hand holding the key jerked back, almost trying to hide it. No luck.
“I already told you. The Phantom’s not for sale!” Old Sam snapped. His eyes were fixated on me in a death glare.
“I’m not here to buy it. I’m here to have it released,” Carpazo said calmly. “I have the paperwork.”

“Paperwork? For an eighty five year old car? Like hell you do!” Old Sam snatched the papers off the table. He looked them up and down, a grimace on his face. I saw his look soften just a little bit before he locked eyes with Carpazo.
“Where the hell did you get these?”
“You can find anything if you know where to look,” Carpazo said. “If I can’t buy the car, I’ll take custody of it.”
“And just what interest is this car to you?” Old Sam demanded.
“It’s simple. I like it, I want it and I get what I want.” He said in a way that made it clear just how used he was to getting what he wanted.

Old Sam narrowed his eyes, then chuckled.
“Well, well… You’ve got balls, don’t you, you little shit. But I can’t let you touch that car.”
With that, he calmly tore the papers in two and for the first time I saw Carpazo’s eye twitch. It was just a small crack in his amicable mask but behind it I saw a seething rage. His eyes settled on the cheque next and he destroyed that next.
“What are you doing?!” I cried.
“The car stays here!” Old Sam said sternly. “Where it belongs, where you can’t touch it!”

I could see Carpazo almost quaking in his rage. I saw his fists clench and unclench. He smiled. There was nothing in it to give away his hidden fury, and yet that spoke volumes more than anything else.
“And you…” Old Sam looked at me now, his own rage apparent. “Selling that damned thing behind my back like a snake! You. You’re done here. Get out.”
“You need that money!” I tried to protest.
“Like hell I do! Give me the keys! Get out!”

He moved towards me. Carpazo’s eyes met mine. I was faster than Old Sam. I tossed the keys onto the counter and watched as Old Sam tried to grab them. Carpazo beat him to it. He snatched the keys up, a big shit eating grin on his face. Old Sam’s expression turned from one of rage to one of horror. He looked at me with quiet disbelief.
“No! NO! What did you do?”
“Your family needs that money!” I said. “It’s a stupid car!”
“No it’s not! It’s Sinclairs car!”
“Yes it is…” Carpazo said softly. He admired the keys in his hand, then looked at Old Sam, still smiling wryly. “And it’s so good to have it back.”
Back?

Carpazo turned towards the door as Old Sam tried to run after him. I tried to stop the old man but he’d moved faster than I’d ever seen him move. He tried to wrestle the keys from Carpazo but I watched as he was knocked aside. He fell towards the counter and his head cracked against it. He didn’t get up again. I rushed to Old Sam’s side but he was out like a light. I don’t know if the impact killed him, or if there was ever a chance that he could be saved. I suppose it didn’t matter either way.

Carpazo laughed humorlessly. He stood in the open door, the moonlight on his face and I looked up at him. Maybe I would’ve asked him ‘Why’. There were a lot of questions I wanted to ask but when I saw him standing in the doorway, all I could think about was the fact that he looked different than before… I couldn’t say how. But now I recognized him. Not as Carpazo. No. I was looking up into the pale face of Mark Sinclair.

“Sorry about the mess, kid… Five million, right? Don’t worry. I’ll get it to you. I always keep my word.”
He admired the key in his hand, smiling contentedly as he did.
“Now this… This I’ve been hoping to get for a long time. Didn’t think I’d ever get past the old man. You’ve done me a solid. You’re a good kid. Thanks for keeping an eye on her for me.”

With that, Sinclair winked and disappeared out the door.Moments later I heard the engine of the Phantom roar to life. It shot past the office and tore out onto the open road. The last I saw of it, were the taillights fading off into the distance.

I only told the Police what I knew they’d believe. Someone had come in, killed Old Sam and taken the Phantom. The rest, I chose to omit. Best not to try and explain what you don’t truly understand.

Right now I’m sitting in Harry’s, nursing a beer as I watch the Police do their work. I’ve given my statement. I’m sure they’ll draw their own conclusions… But I know what I saw. Somehow, Mark Sinclair came back for his car, and I don’t know if that’s a good thing. A little while ago, I heard that some Cops found the car. A little while later, a lot of Cops left in a hurry. I heard the words ‘officers down’. They took Sinclair’s car once. I don’t think he’ll let them take it again.
submitted by HeadOfSpectre to libraryofshadows [link] [comments]

Had an amazing 2-week coachella W2 road trip and wanted to share my itinerary because it worked so damn well!

Hey everyone, I'm a Canadian who's done a couple festivals in Canada (VELD and Osheaga), but I always wanted to go to a camping festival and Coachella worked out amazingly with my school schedule this year. I got most of April off, so I bought 2 W2 passes at the general sale and found a buddy who was interested in doing a road trip. I'm a huge fan of climbing and surfing, and I love California but there's a lot of places I haven't been, so I wanted to work in some of that given how much free time I had. Anyway, here's the details of our trip, hoping it may inspire some future Coachella road trippers!
PRE-TRIP:
  1. Bought 2x W2 passes + Shuttle Pass (unwanted) and car camping on General Sale day ($1200 US total). Wanted W1 and actually had a shot at them but my credit card was maxed out.
  2. Bought flights on SWOOP from Hamilton Ontario (near Toronto) to Vegas - $250 round trip.
  3. Reserved a rental SUV in Vegas for 2 weeks. (Considered a JUCY but eventually decided tents and an SUV would be more flexible and cheaper).
  4. Did some general research on the places I wanted to go, had a rough idea of an itinerary but no bookings.
Sunday April 14-VEGAS:
  • Parked at Hamilton Airport ($65 CAD for 1 wk + $15/day for each additional day).
  • Direct flight Hamilton to Vegas 9:30pm. Packed everything in 1 backpack per person, didn't pay carry-on or checked fee.
  • booked a room at Luxor hotel that same day on Priceline (came to $80 US total for 2 queen beds).
  • Booked campsites at Zion for next 2 days ($20 + $50)
  • Walked around Vegas till 2am drinking beers, checking out casinos (I had never been).
Monday April 15-ZION:
  • Picked up Venture 2P camping rental pack from Basecamp Outdoor Gear in Vegas. Upgraded to 3-season sleeping bags. Came with stove, sleeping pads, 2P tent, camp table, 2 camp chairs, knife, headlights, lantern. $325 for 2 weeks.
  • Grocery run at Walmart, got pasta, meat and sauce, chili, water, etc.
  • Arrived in Zion, did a sunset hike of Watchman trail, set up camp and cooked dinner.
Tues April 16-ZION:
  • Bought America the Beautiful 1-yr all-included National Park pass (covers a whole vehicle). - $80 USD
  • Hiked Zion: Angel's landing was amazing, very cool classic hike with scary cliff drops. The Narrows hike, another classic, was closed (typical in April). Ranger said we had hiked most of the open trails in Zion.
  • Opted to give up our $20 site and instead drive to Page AZ to check out other parks. Easily booked a campsite, $25.
Wed April 17-Antelope Canyon/Grand Canyon:
  • Went on Antelope Canyon tour. $60 US, run by Navajo locals. Short, photography-based tour. Had to either book ahead or show up early for cancellations.
  • Drove to Indio, beautiful drive and stopped at the Grand Canyon on the way.
  • Stayed at Indio motel (booked day-of, $100 US for 2 beds). Owner held onto our camp knife and tent pegs for the weekend!
  • got In-N-Out burger - was amazing
Thurs April 18-SO-CAL:
  • Debated going early for Coachella camping spot, but instead spent the day getting supplies at Walmart (Got info from another camper to get a Canopy - this was key) and in Orange county/LA. Checked out Newport Beach.
  • Pulled into car camping at 10pm, short lines. Spot was pretty far away in 1017 st S, but it really didn't bother us too much. Neighbours were all friendly, most of them stayed around camp for most of the festival though.
  • Checked out silent disco and went to bed.
Fri April 19-COACHELLA:
  • Woke up late, made breakfast, got ready and headed to festival for 2pm. Blown away by how amazing the grounds were. Antarctic was also dope. Saw about 15-20 acts, just exploring the grounds. Went back to camp 1x in evening, then went back to the festival until 1am, then slept.
Sat April 20th-Coachella:
  • Entered fest at about 3pm, regrouped at camp in evening, then went back and stayed till 1am again. Slept
Sun April 21st-Coachella:
  • Lined up for Sunday Service at 7am. Stayed till finish
  • Went to camp, headed to the grounds at 3:30pm, stayed until midnight. Went to turn-down tent for a couple hours, grabbed food, had beers with neighbours and slept around 2-3am.
Mon April 22nd-Joshua Tree:
  • Tore down camp and ready to go by 10am - needed a jumpstart though (dude did it for free because we only had canadian version of AAA!)
  • Grocery run at Wal-Mart
  • drove to Joshua Tree, rented climbing shoes ($10 each), and tried to rent a crash pad but the place was closed.
  • Cooked dinner in the Boy Scout parking lot, then hiked out to backcountry camp (you have to self-register)-FREE.
  • ran into a dude hiking who was gonna go bouldering the next day so we planned to meet up in the morning.
  • Stars in J-Tree are amazing. We threw "Underwater" by Rüfüs du Sol on repeat to relive Antarctic, and right at the final second we saw a gigantic shooting star!
Tues April 23rd-Joshua Tree:
  • Caught sunrise in J-tree from our campsite, then tore down camp and met up with the guys to go bouldering. Bouldered till 3pm, then returned our shoes and did the Mt Ryan hike at sunset.
  • Drove to Santa Barbara for a halfway stop on our way to big sur. 4-5hr drive, motel cost $100 for 2 beds.
Wed April 24 - Surfing/Big Sur
  • Got up late, drove to Pismo beach (such a nice surf town) and rented some boards and wetsuits for the half-day-$25 USD each. Waves were good for beginners to fool around on. Packed up around 4pm and drove towards Big Sur, Highway 1.
  • Saw the elephant seals at the southern tip of Big Sur
  • Saw evening and sunset along Big Sur - truly the most amazing drive I've ever done.
  • Got dinner in Monterey and then drove to Yosemite in the dark. Got to the park entrance at 2AM and slept in the car.
Thurs April 25 - Yosemite
  • Woke up at 5am to drive to Camp 4 and get spots in this famous campground where rock climbing was born. We were 12th in line for 59 spots, and cost is $6/person per night. (*NOTE: this first-come first-serve system is getting shut down forever in May - you will have to enter an overnight online lottery).
  • We set up camp (6 people share a site - our site-mates were really friendly and we met lots of great people in Camp 4).
  • We hiked Upper Yosemite Falls which starts right at Camp 4. Took all day as we decided to try to get to El Capitan during a trail closure (many trails were closed due to snow). We didn't succeed but it was fun.
Fri April 26 - Yosemite
  • We rented shoes and boulder mats in Yosemite and went bouldering until 3pm. There are great boulders right near Camp 4.
  • At 3:30pm we did the Mist Trail hike, which brings you to Vernal falls and Nevada falls. It's beautiful and a lot easier than Upper Falls.
Sat April 27 - San Francisco
  • Caught sunrise over the Dawn Wall of El Capitan. This was an amazing sight to me.
  • Tore down camp and headed out before 11am. Drove to San Francisco (5 hours), crossed the Golden Gate in.
  • Got a cheap motel in San Francisco ($110/night for 2 beds). Used the Ford GoBikes ($10/24h) and did a bike tour of Japantown, Chinatown, Pier 39, Fisherman's Wharf, Mission District, Coit Tower and Telegraph hill, Haight-Ashbury, and Presidio/Palace of Fine Arts. Got home at about 3am, exhausted.
Sun April 28th
  • Woke up at 7am for the long drive back to Vegas. Stopped at the google campus in Mountain View to ride the GBikes around.
  • Got to Vegas at 5pm, returned our camping gear and ate some great Mexican food.
  • Flew back to Hamilton on a 10:30pm flight.
Overall we had an AMAZING coachella, saw some breathtaking views, got a taste of California climbing and surfing, did some amazing drives, and met awesome people. We spent a lot of time outdoors and we felt super relaxed by the end of the trip. I think overall we did well saving money, and had a good mix of planning and spontaneity.
WOULD DO DIFFERENTLY:
  • Plan only 1 day in Zion and book campsite in advance - too many closures in April. Maybe spend some time in another park (Death Valley, Mojave, etc)
  • Spend less time on Friday getting supplies and more time in So-Cal (check out LA Observatory, LA Proper or San Diego)
  • Try to do less campsite re-groups for coachella, and just stay once I enter the grounds. Maybe go a little later in the day to stay out later. Try and find a big group there to party with early on. Bring more Mio Sports (1/person/day would be safe) for electrolyte hydration :P
  • Try not to let our battery die on Monday - think I left a door open, oops
  • Get to J-Tree a little earlier for a boulder mat (3:30 or so)
  • See the eucalyptus forest in Pismo Beach!
  • Bring my own climbing shoes, maybe other climbing gear too.
I definitely travel very fast and I was lucky to have a travel buddy who was able to keep up. But if you want to see some amazing parts of california and have some free time around coachella, I hope this gives you some ideas! Drop any questions below, and let me know if you think it would be good to crosspost this anywhere.
Thanks!
PS: We got so much good coachella info from this Sub. Not sure how it would have gone without everyone's help. Thank you!
submitted by john_samps to Coachella [link] [comments]

Toronto Daily - Oct 11th 2019

Welcome to the Toronto Daily Thread.

This thread serves two purposes:
1) To collect and make visible new posts in smaller Toronto based subreddits.
Feel free to visit, comment and be generally helpful in posts indexed below. Please also remember to stay on your best behaviour when travelling outside of /toronto.
2) To act as a general off-topic conversation hub for the day.
To that end, use this thread to talk about whatever is on your mind, regardless of whether or not it's related to Toronto.
No matter where you're posting, please remember to be excellent to each other.

/AskTO

Post Title Author Comments
Bathurst stn streetcar incident Yoghurt187 1
Where do I go to meet extroverts? something_dumb_59 0
Help/support for adult autistic girl Deadsoonn 1
Parking ticket with incorrect plate. Do I need to pay? Umbabo 6
Best way to find a carpool to Bolton? dkel1674 1
Where to meet other people around my age? SubstantialDentist0 2
Is the Gardiner closed tomorrow evening? Whyeff89 2
Dog owners, do you prefer if someone asks to pet your dog, or do you not mind as long as they are gentle and not aggressive? TorontoJD 8
In search of physiotherapist bettyqxw 3
Quick question for anyone who has adopted a cat from Toronto Humane Society, I completely forgot to ask them, do they give temporary food? How big is it? Is it like a small bag, lol. Do they give wet food? ihavenoideawhattonam 12
Laundry with parking? Allboobandmoreboob 12
I'd like to spend 1k-1.5k on a dinner for two. Thisprobablywontgowe 15
Anyone have any experience in becoming a Parking Enforcement Officer for the City? hip-hophippopotamus 6
Where can I watch or stream the upcoming debate? --vera-- 1
Who else is joining me in boycotting the new star wars game 'jedi fallen order'? Its released on 15th November... TeegeeackXenu 14
Ultra short term leasing options? cabinet876 7
How long will it take to drive to Niagara from downtown this weekend with the gardiner closed? TorontoJD 10
Where should I take my in-laws this Saturday? Encubed 3
Best Line of Credit rate in Toronto gsc_chris 2
Best Black Forest cake? Canada_girl 2
What are my rights when formally giving notice for my job? Breezel123 3
Which is better? Wonderland Halloween Haunt, or Screemers at the Ex? Nonabelian 4
Would anyone like to go to a movie premier tomorrow ? "Harpoon" 9:30 PM Elchupacabrobot 0
Anywhere I buy Korean Honey Butter Almonds in the GTA? notathrowaway123u834 3
How much do walk in clinics charge? Redhoodgothamknight 7

/TorontoJobs

Post Title Author Comments
Klick Is Hiring! (200 positions) redditklick 0
[Hiring][Internship] Deep Learning Intern – Content & Technology (WinteSpring 2020) ai_jobs 0

/TorontoEvents

Post Title Author Comments
Toronto Writing Circle! transandkonfused 1
HUNKS (sketch comedy from Winnipeg) Saturday, Oct. 12, 7:00pm @ Comedy Bar RoryFallis 0
"Pubalicious" - geek social & board game afternoon, Sat Oct 12 @ Madison Ave. Pub, 3-9pm GlamourHyena 0
October Monthly Reddit Toronto Meetup mortuusanima 0

/GTAMarketPlace

Post Title Author Comments
2 GOLD TICKETS FOR LEAFS VS CAPITALS OCT 29 @7PM ZooWeeDeutch 0
[Selling] $100/ticket. Eric Suen 孫耀威 & Vivian Lai 黎瑞恩 Mon • Oct 21 • 8:30 PM The Avalon Ballroom Theatre At Niagara Fallsview Casino Resort sprungy 0
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submitted by thetorontobot to toronto [link] [comments]

61 bullet points of Trump investigations so far....

source: https://twitter.com/kurteichenwald/
  1. Trump lied to Congress that he was not meeting with any Indian casino executives when documents and sworn statements show he was.
  2. Trump testified under oath that he is willing to claim success on something even when he knows his claim is false.
  3. Deutsche Bank concluded Trump net worth at $788 million when he was publicly claiming (and told bank) he was worth multiple billions.
  4. Trump said under oath that he determines his net worth based on how he feels.
  5. While Trump suggests he has an MBA from prestigious Wharton graduate school, only attended undergraduate program for 2 years. Has no MBA
  6. Trump’s first project, given to him by his dad, lost money, according to state records. Trump has publicly lied that it made money.
  7. Trump’s second project was a Broadway show. It bombed, closing after 96 performances. He lost his investment.
  8. Trump’s claim that his dad gave him only $1m is a lie. His trust fund was $1 mill. Dad gave $10.4m for a bogus consultant job guaranteed $70 m loan, got him $35m credit line, laundered $3.35mill 2 Don in illegal casino deal, loaned $7.5m more (never repaid.)
  9. As Trump claimed great success, tax returns showed not. In ‘78 lost $1.5M. In ‘79, lost $11.4m. No bankruptcy cause dad gave him more $
  10. When Trump built Taj Mahal, testified under oath to NJ he'd only use bank loans, not junk bonds. No bank would lend. Used junk bonds
  11. Trump’s 3 casinos all competed with each other, which is why no banks loans. Taj took business from his other 2 casinos, crippling all.
  12. Trump spent huge sums on airline, promising top elegance. People w/ airline experience said it couldnt work. It never turned a profit.
  13. After Trump’s top casino execs died in accident, Trump took over running them. Large numbers of execs quit because of his management.
  14. When Trump about to default on interest payment for casino, his dad/he broke law by having dad launder $3.35 mill through casino.
  15. Dad gave Trump another $150,000 loan next day, unreported to banks, in violation of bank agreement.
  16. Rules breaking in financing (money laundering from dad etc) resulted in sanctions against him from NJ casino commission.
  17. Trump banks were forced to make deal with him after bankruptcy of casinos because he personally guaranteed loans. If they went after personal guarantee, entire Trump empire would collapse and banks would lose billions. Banks loaned him tons more to save him.
  18. Trump was $3.5 bill in debt. Later, when banks bailed him out, he claimed in books he was $9.5bill in debt to make recovery look better.
  19. Trump admitted under oath that, when he claimed he was $9.5 bill in debt in his books, it was a lie and he knew it.
  20. No banks will lend to Trump except Deutsche Bank. In 2008, he defaulted on a $640 mill construction loan to them.
  21. List of Trump failures: TrumpMortgage, TrumpFinancial, Trump Hotels & Casino Resorts, Trump Shuttle, GoTrump.com, Trump Vodka, Trump Steaks, Trump Taj, Trump Castle, Trump Plaza, Trump Dubai, Trump University, Trump Toronto, Trump Hollywood..I could go on many more tweets listing Trump's business failures. It'd be easier to list the Trump businesses that haven't failed.
  22. In Trump University, Trump claimed to “personally select” teachers who would teach real estate secrets. He did not, they did not.
  23. Unable to get bank loans because of his terrible record as a businessman, Trump began selling his name 4 use on other ppl’s projects.
  24. Trump marketed projects of other developers as his own. Only those who read dense legal agreement’s fine print learned it was a lie.
  25. Trump sold his name 2 incompetent developers whose projects collapsed, costing people who paid deposits millions while he made millions.
  26. When condo buyers sued Trump for falsely claiming projects of other developers were his, he said they should have read the fine print.
  27. Trump testified he did a favor to the condo buyers who lost millions by trusting him, because they avoided the real estate collapse.
  28. In 1990, one of Trump’s lieutenants told me ““The thing you don’t understand about Donald Trump is that he’s mentally ill.”
  29. I wrote about Trump 4 New York Times. First time we spoke, he lied to me in his first sentence. He told three more lies in 5 min call.
  30. Trump lied that to WashPost in '87 that he knew stock market crash was coming and sold all his stocks. SEC filings prove it.
  31. To escape liability for fraud, Trump argued that a “development by Donald Trump” is different than “a Donald Trump development.”
  32. Trump wrote “Bill Clinton was great president,” denied it under oath then said wrote it be4 knowing of Lewinsky scandal of 10 yrs before
  33. In 2008, Trump wrote, “I know Hillary, and I think she would make a great president." Testified in 2016 he wrote it without thinking.
  34. Asked under oath identities of professors at Trump U (there were none) Trump said “I know names, but I don't know the identities.”
  35. After saying under oath he knew the names of professors at Trump U (none existed) Trump could not name any.
  36. When sued for saying other developers buildings were his, Trump said truth wasn’t in ads because there wasn’t enough room 4 the words.
  37. Trump claimed to own 50% of a project when he owned 30%. His explanation under oath: “I always felt like I owned 50%.”
  38. Trump said he was paid $1m for speech when paid $400,000. Under oath, he agreed he was paid 400, but said $1mill was still correct.
  39. Trump has never released a real medical report. His father had alzheimers, which is genetic and could hit at about Trump’s age.
  40. In 2007, Trump said his favorite book was his own, The Art of the Deal. Once he started running 4 president, he said it was the Bible.
  41. When asked to give his favorite words from the Bible, Trump cited an Old Testament phrase that was the only one repudiated by Jesus.
  42. When testifying under oath, Trump refused to answer questions 97 times about infidelities and suspected mistresses.
  43. Trump has called for US military to commit 3 different war crimes. When told military would refuse, he said theyd do what he commanded.
  44. Trump has directly insulted leaders of four allied countries, while offering effusive praise to Vladimir Putin.
  45. Trump has refused to release the letter sent by the IRS to prove he is under audit, despite dozens of requests from many reporters.
  46. An investigation of Trump’s partners reveals an enterprise with deep ties to global financiers, foreign politicians and even criminals.
  47. Trump’s business interests run in direct conflict with the national security interests of the United States.
  48. Trump revealed none of his partners or dealings with overseas entities in his financial disclosure to the FEC.
  49. Trump receives $8 million a year from South Korea business w/ interests in nukes. He has called for SK to have nukes.
  50. Trump’s efforts in India were first shot down by politicians. His business partner is now under investigation by police.
  51. Trump’s conflicts in India are irreparable, and in issues with Pakistan, his financial interests lie solely with India.
  52. Trump’s business partner in Turkey has been arrested for fraud.
  53. Turkey’s president has told associates he will not allow US to use an airbase key to the battle against ISIS if Trump is president.
  54. Trump’s first business partners in UAE were indicted on charges of fraud.
  55. When a member of Saudi royal family criticized Trump, Trump attacked him as “dopey” and said he wants to control America w/ “daddy’s $”
  56. Trump tried to strike a deal Libyan Investment Authority under Qaddafi, and offered murdering Libyan dictator a place 2 stay at his home
  57. The father of Trump’s business partner in Azerbaijan is govnt official who US intelligence says launders money for the Iranian military.
  58. Trump’s statement he would avoid conflicts by placing his company in a blind trust is a lie; what he describes is not a blind trust.
  59. Trump told GOPrs at debate that he never pushed Jeb Bush for casino deal in Florida. Under oath a few years earlier, he said he did.
  60. In 1999, Trump’s company secretly violated Cuban embargo. Months later, in 1st run for president, Trump said he never would.
  61. Trump officials were advised to hide the payments spent in violation of Cuban embargo as being related to charity work.
edit: adding more
  1. Trump calls for return to American steel. Yet he secretly used Chinese steel on his last 2 developments projects 2 increase his profits
  2. Trump opted out of using steel on many buildings, instead purchasing concrete from businesses controlled by Genovese crime family.
  3. To hide the ultimate source of his Chinese steel, Trump purchased it through a shell company based in the British Virgin Islands.
  4. Money paid to the Chinese steel manufacturers went to repay loans from Chinese banks, which are arms of the state.
  5. Trump has said he has been forced to use China to manufacture his clothing line because no one makes such things in USA. That’s a lie.
  6. For Trump Chicago building, Trump obtained financing from George Soros. (Means nothing, but it terrifies conserv conspiracy theorists.)
  7. During his time buying Chinese steel, Chinese companies were dumping steel on US market. That cost many steelworkers their jobs.
  8. Trump hides his taxes, but we know: He lost $ in ’78-’79, paid no taxes from 91-93, lost $1B in ’95 and likely never paid taxes since.
  9. Trump read manufactured, bogus Russian propaganda at a rally within hours of it appearing on the internet.
  10. After promising to salvage precious artworks on a building for the Met, Trump had them jackhammered instead to save $32,000.
  11. To explain his destruction of art, Trump posed as spokesman “John Barron” and lied that appraisers had called the works worthless
  12. If Trump had simply invested $ he received from his dad in a mutual fund, he’d be worth far more than he is, a sign of bad business.
  13. Trump regularly cheats at golf, even revising scorecard after a match 2 transform defeat into victory, according 2 ppl who play w/ him
  14. Trump persuaded an elderly couple who ran an antique store to let him “try out” 2 valuable pieces, then refused to return or pay 4 them
  15. Trump bought jewelry in Manhattan, then colluded with the store to ship empty boxes out of state so he could dodge New York sales tax.
  16. Trump told a “friend” whom he sued over several years that he did so because the friend hadn’t given him enough praise.
  17. When business execs came to his office, Trump bragged about his wife, Melania & showed them nude photographs of her from modeling days.
  18. Trump reneged on a family-wide commitment to pay medical bills for his nephew’s severely sick baby because he was mad.
  19. Trump engaged in a civil conspiracy to defraud union pension funds by hiring undocumented Polish workers, a court found.
submitted by gaming99 to EnoughTrumpSpam [link] [comments]

Niagara Falls Day Tour From Toronto

The favourite countries of the Western part of the world are the US and Canada. Undoubtedly these nations are multiculturally diverse. People are friendly, love travelling to destinations and are fun loving. A great ecological balance is maintained with discipline all the time by these nations. Niagara Falls Day Tour From Toronto is one of the best fun-filled tours.
Niagara Falls, Canada Side:
People travelling from Toronto to Niagara Falls get loads of entertainment when compared to the travel from the US end. The Niagara Falls divides the US and Canada and is one of the most beautiful borders in the world. It is always nice to start the Niagara Falls Tour from Toronto with day tours.
Why most people visit the Niagara Falls?
Niagara Falls always has beautiful, magnificent and breath-taking views, which makes a visit to it memorable for all in their lifetime. It is for this reason, many people visit the Niagara Falls from many parts of the world. Niagara Falls is an interesting destination for tourism. No visit to Canada is complete without a visit to the Niagara Falls From Toronto.
How Does the Day Tour Start From Toronto?
The Niagara Falls Day Tour from Toronto starts with personalized pickups from various notified destinations. The pickup points can be from the traveller’s destination, hotels, highway points or from points where the tour operator specifies. The pickups are done through the tour operator’s fleet of vehicles. These vehicles include four and eight-seat cars, or SUVs, limos and other luxury vehicles, minivans, minibuses, and large bus coaches. It takes just an hour and a half time of travel by road to reach Niagara Falls from Toronto.
Check Travellers Reviews On The Internet:
If you have a debate on which side is good for entertainment with colourful picturesque, you better browse through the Internet. Check with the keyword, Niagara Falls Day Tour from Toronto, you can find many reviews on the Internet about which end of the Niagara Falls is the best. Most people who visited from both ends, that is the, US and Canada ends, would rate Niagara Falls Tours From Toronto high. This tour has given them the best tour experience to the Niagara Falls region to and fro.
Tour Guides Double Your Entertainment:
The presence of tour guides makes the to and fro journey more interesting along with all other entertainments the travellers enjoy. The tour guides are all licensed and fully professional making the trip lively and more entertaining. Tour guides speak multiple International languages which makes the journey more interesting for any traveller.
Entertainment Places At The Niagara Falls:
After reaching the Niagara Falls area, the entertainment starts with: 1) Journey Behind The Falls. 2) Casino Niagara. 3) Skylon Tower. 4) Wineries in the Niagara region. 5) The Floral Clock. 6) Whirlpool Aero Car. 7) Nightmares Fear Factory. 8) Niagara White Water Walk. 9) Kurtz Orchards Farm and Marketplace. 10) Great Canadian Midway. 11) Reg’s Candy Kitchen. 12) House of Frankenstein. 13) The Tower Hotel. 14) Dufferin Islands. 15) Marineland of Canada 16) The Bird Kingdom.
The Exciting Hornblower Cruise:
In the Niagara Falls Day Tours From Toronto, apart from the above-mentioned places, one can also try the Hornblower cruise. The Hornblower is a great experience where one can see the Niagara Falls from close quarters by taking a ride in the boat. This is called the Niagara Falls Boat Tour or the Hornblower Cruise ride. The Hornblower boat easily accommodates around 350 people with a meal and seating arrangements. Overall, this is a great boat ride that gives everyone a great and thrilling experience coupled with fun.
submitted by niagarafallstours to u/niagarafallstours [link] [comments]

Toronto Vs. Hong Kong (my reflection, and opinion).

Hi /Toronto.
I have lived in Hong Kong for a year now, and before that, Toronto for 5 years (working, not studying). I'm born in Canada, but didn't grow up in Toronto (grew up elsewhere in Canada), I'm sure I'll be back though.
Here is a reflection on some things I miss about Toronto, and just some general things that Toronto could learn from HK.
Things I miss:
Generally clean environment.
Usually something to do on the weekend with some sort of cultural stuff going on, like busker fest, or whatever - especially in the summer time.
The restaurants, and the ethnic variety to choose from.
I especially miss the blue chip wagon (mr. tasty fries) poutine (Smokes is garbage by comparison... sorry).
Everyone says sorry for pretty much everything (lol).
Getting to watch movies at the North American premiere date.
TV Shows and schedule are better than in HK (for American stuff, of course... but I mean, I go online anyways).
Driving a car... man I miss that.
BBQing
Shopping at Loblaws, and PC food in general (like the chocolate chip cookie... man, I miss that a lot).
working 9-5
Things I don't miss:
TTC, wow I hate that service with true passion, I mean it works - but dang, avoid it as much as possible.
No Cell phone/data service underground (I think it's on it's way at least).
Cold winter
The drunk people
The racists
Rob Ford (even though I voted for that poor guy... sorry, Toronto).
Sales Tax (and Canadian tax in general, actually).
Bell, Rogers, Telus... slow, expensive internet. and expensive cell smartphone bills.
Any of the sports teams (Argos, Leafs, Raps or Jays)
I'm probably forgetting some things for now. Toronto, like HK has a lot of dysfunction especially in the politics... but Toronto has added advantage that it is more transparent than here. HK is free, but its slowly becoming messed up.
Some opinions...
TTC really needs some serious overhaul. It works, but only kind of, and Torontonians are either woefully ashamed of it, or incredibly proud that it is able scrape by with it's 'next to nothing' funding. I am personally in the "very ashamed camp"... and seriously, the proud ones, gotta open up your eyes. TTC sucks, and bad. Countless delays, ridiculous fare pricing, and still using tokens?!?!, signal problems, streetcars getting stuck because of an idiot left turning car, dirty dirty dirty (ban food and drink from the subway, and you will get a lot of money from fines, and help pay for the cleaning staff). It's so utterly disappointing to see how far in the dark ages Toronto is with public transit. I get it though, Toronto is a car city. Here in HK (where something like 3% of the population own a car), the subway system, Bus system, and street car system (yah HK has a streetcar! err here they call them Ding Dings, haha!), are all separate entities that are privately operated (like a utility company I guess). A lot of lefties are gonna cry foul for private this and that, but somehow it works in HK. No idea why, but Toronto should seriously examine other systems and find out ways to adapt it.
OK, I also really don't like Winter. With the exception of snowboarding, I don't miss the Toronto winter at all. It's mild, compared to say, Ottawa or Montreal, but it's just a straight up nuisance. Blue Mountain also, sucks... But HK has no snow whatsoever.
Toronto has a serious infrastructure issue - I can't believe Toronto doesn't have the money to just maintain its roads properly, build new railways, and other tings like like bike lanes. Its embarrassing that the city is the richest, most populous in the country, and yet the Gardiner and DVP are a complete disaster and Torontonians just politely put up with it, and debate forever. Bike lanes, there are some, but Toronto needs more of them. HK has none.
Working 9-5 or 9-6, Definitely like that about Toronto. The work culture is great, and people are awesome. I like Toronto people for their awesomeness. You have time for a life outside of the office or job... which is great.
Surprisingly, Toronto food service is good at sit down restaurants. Here in HK, it sucks - big time. Here it's fast, but rushed... and cramped. In Toronto, on average... it's better. And you've got some good variety too if you enjoy other culture's food. Pho in Toronto, totally whoops HK Pho's ass.
You got sports teams, and that's awesome. But I don't care for them...
Toronto is talking about getting a Casino - don't do it, man. Let Niagara keep the trash there. If Toronto builds one, you should make every Torontonian $50 entry fee... and let only tourists in for free. That way, Torontonians hopefully will have less incentive to become a degenerate. Don't get me wrong, gambling can be fun... but mostly it's a BAD IDEA.
Last thing. I totally miss Toronto... awesome city. Best city in Canada... The worst thing about Toronto is the TTC. The best thing about Toronto, is everything else.
TLDR. Toronto and HK are both awesome, in their own ways.
submitted by torontoexpat to toronto [link] [comments]

Debaters/economists of reddit, casino? Good or bad? More info in description

I have a huge debate tournament this weekend, the resolution is "this house would allow for the operation and construction of a casino in Toronto" I would appreciate any insight even if it is not specific to Toronto! I hope this is thought provoking enough!
submitted by BasedJedi to AskReddit [link] [comments]

[Table] IamA Native American woman on a full ride scholarship to become an attorney for my tribe; AMA!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2013-11-29
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
I spent a bit of time amongst the natives in British Columbia. I quickly discovered most Canadians are quite upset with all of the things the native peoples receive from the government and how much of it seems to go to waste. I've seen firsthand many problems with alcoholism and other problems. My question is, how do you think these problems can be overcome? Does the government have a role in fixing First Nations problems? Our tribe doesn't receive any money or resources from the government unless there's a settlement on something. All of our money comes from the casino and other enterprises; however, tribal members get per capitas and have access to many resources from that money. And sometimes, people take advantage in all the wrong ways.
I don't know quite how the problems could be overcome because I've experienced first hand that an addict will not get better unless he/she wants to. No amount of consequences are going to change that. However, I think resources should be limited to those who are going to use them right. I've advocated for drug tests before access to scholarships/emergency funds/etc. on our reservation but it's a tough rule to implement. You can't just go around drug testing people and those tests cost somewhere around $35 each where I live.
I don't think the government has a role unless they are actively providing for that tribe (if that's what they do in Canada... I'm unsure). My tribe is sovereign so it's up to us to overcome it. And believe me when I say we are trying. It's hard though... people will do what they want to do.
What instance(s) drove you to make this decision? You seem very dedicated to your tribe - was the decision more for you or for them? Originally, I wanted to be a doctor but I wasn't cut out for it. I started studying philosophy and changed to be pre-law. My dad (who is full Native) pushed me to intern at our attorney's office and I found that it was really eye opening. They had me travel to look at another tribe's court system and help our court expand; they even involved me in business decisions. I didn't really know that we still had to fight for some rights before I worked there.
But also, as of now there are no tribal attorneys in the office. I think it's important to have our people in those kind of positions.
Edit: to answer - for both. It helps me secure my future as well as be a part of helping my tribe move forward.
Could you elaborate on still fighting for rights? It isn't something you hear about often (unless you live in OK like me). We mostly deal with fishing and hunting rights on our tribe.
Also, in WA State last year they implemented a new law where alcohol could be sold in grocery stores but this made the taxes go up to like 24% or something. And the government was trying to tax our smoke shop that amount. But taxes are different on the reservation because we are a sovereign nation so they had a court case on that.
Also also, we received a settlement last Summer for water rights... I wasn't involved though so I don't know what it was about.
I'm Metis and I wonder if you face extreme/minor biggotry/racism still? I think the most bigot/racist things I encounter these days are "haha you guys have a casino" or the "how - I can speak Native" people. Most often people are just curious what a reservation is.
My second question is what kind of law are you going to study to help or be employed by your tribe? If I go to school back home I'll be studying Indian Law. If I can get into the school that offers that program at least... Our attorney's mostly deal with business and treaty rights so hopefully I can get a grasp on those.
My third Do you ever go up north in Canada to go see how the natives up there are doing ? There's an anthropologist who has helped our tribe a lot. She's about 90yrs old. Last Summer I went with her on a trip to Canada (to help her get home safely). Myself and the other intern did a little walking around and visited the museums and stores. But other than that I haven't visited the First Nations' people; it would be awesome to dedicate a trip to that someday.
Keep me as a contact then Im in Ottawa me and the wife are both Metis and we have 4 Res' in our area you are going to be shocked to see how poorly they treat us and how shitty the land they took and gave back is. :/ will do; I know the government sometimes still fights tribes and some can't fight back. We fight back and often win. We live under two treaties and are really involved in making sure we get those rights. But I know our tribe is lucky to have received good land and 20 years ago wasn't doing so well.
What college did you go to? I'm at Johns Hopkins currently. And I hope to go to UW law school.
"how" Poached. If you're not familiar with the joke, and you have a sense of humor, I'd be happy to tell it. It has something to do with when settlers spoke to Natives they always asked how or something right?
Idk if your aware but Dartmouth college (which is an ivy league) was established to help native Americans in terms of education, and often give them special privileges, so if u cant get into your other choice,Dartmouth might be a great option for you. Wow, thanks! I'll certainly put them on my list.
How do natives want to live? Alcoholism is common. I think there's many factors to it. I mentioned in another question how Natives commonly have more ADHs than other races which means we process alcohol quicker (don't throw up and rarely hangovers). But also, some people grow up in very tough households and turn to self medication. My father was severely abused as a child and is a Vietnam War Vet - he's an alcoholic.
Is there a desire/fantasy to return to a nomadic life? I don't think that there's a desire to return to nomadic life. I think people want to hold true to their heritage but also adapt to modern life. We fish/hunt/gather but also buy grocery store food. We have powwows as well but our tribe only holds three a year. Some people travel to other tribes to participate but I don't.
Sweet jesus, he never had a fair chance. Hmm there's a shaker church (kinda like Quaker but not if I remember correctly) and a Pentecostal church on our tribe (my aunt owns it). I think there are less people involved in the Shaker church than there used to be but funerals are still held there. My parents were never very religious and I used to go to the Pentecostal as a kid but by choice and without my parents. There's no pressure to go I think in many of the households.
What about religion? What is popular amongst your tribe? All in all though we are pretty spiritual. Don't drop an eagle feather (and have it blessed if you do), don't go to the cemetery after certain hrs... stuff like that.
Is it possible to "join" your nation ? like becoming a US citizen ? You have to have a certain amount of blood quantum in order to be enrolled. I think there are rare cases where someone is "adopted" in but I don't think they have access to all of the resources.
How do you feel about it ? They recently lowered the blood quantum. I don't see it as anything negative. If someone has whatever amount is applicable, they should be able to enroll and have access to the resources we have. Some people think it's bad though; they think it will lead to people taking advantage of it. But there aren't a lot of cases where someone finds out they have Muckleshoot blood in them... so I don't think it's so bad.
Crushing my dreams of becoming a badass indian chief, one post at a time :o. We'll make our own tribe... with blackjack and whores?
I've very recently started getting interested in the law, mostly due to the Illustrated Guide to the Law. What would you recommend as a first read about the intersection between federal and tribal (or Muckleshoot specifically) law? Woah that's an awesome link. I've bookmarked it.
I hate to say I haven't done a lot of reading of public material. Most of what I've read on our legal system is from our attorney's office. However, here is an overview of our tribe and it has some of the court cases (specifically US v WA) that reflects my tribe.
What do you think keeps many Native Americans from using their resources afforded by government for free education? I recall seeing another ama where a member of a (perhaps Canadian?) tribe cited the view from other tribe members that going to a white man's college was selling out their tribe's way of life. Is that a common viewpoint? I don't think anyone feels like that from my reservation. We have a Tribal College but it's more like a community college and the people that attend it are mostly the older generation that missed out on going to college when they were younger. The government doesn't give us (me) the resources though; my tribe does. I know there are government scholarships but they aren't for everyone if I understand correctly. I think people are just afraid sometimes too. I'm across the country right now and it has been very hard. We grow up in a small community where everyone knows everyone. I'm the first in my family to go to college.
What is life like in reservations? Do you have the same luxuries as the rest of America (internet, television, running water, electricity, etc.)? On my reservation we do. Many of our people live in poverty but I believe it to be by choice. Our tribe has many resources - emergency funds for members, food bank, scholarship, jobs, etc. So many people don't feel a need to work... But there's also those of us that are helping to expand our tribe. We have a casino, smoke shop, market and deli, government system, amphitheater, lodge and spa etc. And it keeps a lot of our people employed.
I know our tribe is doing fairly well in these terms but there are others that got land in deserts that aren't so lucky...
What do you think about the redskins name change debate? I agree that the name is offensive but I hadn't thought much about it until it became a big problem. I acknowledged before all this but it was more of a "hmm that's offensive" and moved on.
Do you feel like progress for those in your tribe to become wealthier and healthier individuals is prevented by the traditional values/rules your tribe holds? I don't think our tribe is held back by traditional values but I know that some tribes are. We are a fairly progressive tribe. We still have our culture but we also participate in modern culture. Our tribe really encourages tribal members to get out and go to college somewhere off the rez. They want everyone to get their education and choose what to do with their lives whether it be on the tribe or off.
How do you feel about assimilation? I think we've lost a lot of our culture. Way back when, when the Europeans forced the Native children to go to boarding school and speak only English a lot of languages were lost, a lot of traditions were lost. I don't know if it was for the better. I can't say that I don't appreciate where my tribe is now. We are fairly wealthy; we are huge contributors to charity and all of our members have access to resources... but our language is nearly dead. And I don't dance at powwows though I've always wished I did. I think it'd be nice to have more of our culture so long as it doesn't hold us back. (but then again, who decides what held back is?)
If you don't mind me asking...was alcoholism a problem on your reservation? It is :( My dad's an alcoholic.
I've heard that on many of the reservations alcohol has been, and continues to be, a large problem. I did a research paper on alcoholism in high school. Native Americans have the most alcohol dehydrogenases of any race. Which means our bodies process alcohol really well. So... I don't suffer the negative side effects of drinking. I rarely get hangovers. So people are more likely to drink because they don't feel the negative effects. Not that that's an excuse... just some insight.
What's your opinion on the idle no more movement? Has it played any role in your choice of career path? No treaty rights should be infringed upon. The government has a horrid past of giving land/rights to the indigenous people and taking it back. We have a phrase called "Indian giver." It's always been kinda tossed around growing up. Like if I gave my sister a toy then took it back she'd call me an Indian Giver. I never understood it as a kid lol. But I do now. Anyway, any government that makes a treaty and gives rights to a tribe shouldn't infringe upon those. From my understanding that's what Idle No More is about. I don't follow the movement but I understand it. I think I have the same thought process going into my career; I hope to keep our rights as well as help my tribe progress.
I'm only asking this because you brought it up in an earlier post, is "how" an actual greeting in any native language, as far as you know. It just seems like a Hollywood cliche. As far as I know, "how" is not an actual greeting. In our language, "hoyt" is goodbye. I don't know hello and I'm pretty sure the spelling I used for the previous is not correct; it's just the sound it makes in English.
Indian Giver is an insult towards North American Indians. So I've learned... interesting.
Maybe marry in? danileigh? Have a kid that's a member? Of course if you marry and have children they could be enrolled (as long as they meet the quantum for whatever tribe). My children will be enrolled but I'm unsure if there children will be. Marrying would make you a part of the community but wouldn't allow you to enroll yourself.
I've heard about the rampant alcoholism present in the reservations, have you seen any of it first hand? How bad is it? Are there any programs in place to help? This is my answer on the same question:
> It is :( My dad's an alcoholic.
> I did a research paper on alcoholism in high school. Native Americans have the most alcohol dehydrogenases of any race. Which means our bodies process alcohol really well. So... I don't suffer the negative side effects of drinking. I rarely get hangovers. So people are more likely to drink because they don't feel the negative effects. Not that that's an excuse... just some insight.
There's a lot of drug and alcohol use on our res and the police/tribal council are really trying to combat it. My dad's an alcoholic, two of my sisters are addicted to prescription pain pills, one of my nephews is, etc. The tribe will pay for rehab indefinitely. My sister has gone so many times. And they have a halfway house for after. They really really try to help people get better but no one will get better unless they want to. Our court is working on a system now that requires rehab for people who commit crimes and fail a drug test (there's rampant theft on the res to pay for drugs).
In Canada (major cities like Montreal, Toronto, Edmonton, Calgary), one of the things I have noticed is that I have yet to see any native person who looks well to do. Is it similar in the US and in your tribe? And does that mean that richer people live on reservations or richer ones blend in more? Does the tribe help those who have settled outside of the sovereign lands? I think it really depends on where you are. There are some reservations that are doing really poorly and you won't see anyone doing well on them. Whereas, on my tribe you mostly see people doing well and the ones that aren't are poor by choice. I mentioned my father is an alcoholic but he's a functional one- he makes six figures. The people living off the reservation can still have access to most of the resources but I'm unsure which specifically. My father is an elder so the youth crew comes and mows his lawn; I'm sure those that live far don't receive that lol.
Does the "my mother says I'm 1/8th native but we have no proof" type of person insult you or make you mad? No, it doesn't insult me or bother me. Sometimes I'll say I'm Native and about ten other people will chime "me too!" but it doesn't bother me haha. I'm half but I look completely white.
I'm lucky enough to know which tribe I originate from, be enrolled, and have an active life in our community. But I know that others don't have that and that's okay.
Did you follow the Baby Veronica case a few months ago? I didn't but I just read an article. But I think that's an issue that is on every reservation. We have an ICW system and our tribe does everything it can to keep our children in our culture. And they work to NEVER terminate parental rights. I mean, if a parent gives them up then so be it but our tribe works very hard with parents to keep them involved. I've never heard of anyone on our tribe being disenrolled either.
I have a few Native friends and was surprised to learn a few didn't know about the scholarships and grants offered to Native Americans. (Where live) Why do you think that is? I thought that all students were aware of minority scholarships and would actively seek them. There could be a lot that contributes to that. My tribe has it's own scholarship program so I never thought to seek outside scholarships. I know they exist though. All kinds of minority scholarships exist so it's a no brainer that there is some form for Natives.
I guess it depends on how badly you feel the need for it; some people are content with taking out loans, some people can pay their way, some people just don't care about going to college in the first place, and some people don't want to put the work in to write essays and stuff and compete with others for scholarships.
If you feel like answering another question... So, what's the deal with Tribal law in regards to federal law? I believe I learned that each reservation is subject to its own law, as a sovereign nation, as long as those laws don't contradict federal law; which to me means that each reservation is like its own little country, which is pretty cool. Do many tribes take advantage of this? How often does this come into conflict with state law? Regarding that, when I am traveling through a reservation can I be held accountable for crimes in violation of the tribal law, even if I were not aware of them? Or, perhaps, prosecuted for violating state law, even though I'm in sovereign state? Please forgive my rough interpretation of this issue, but I'm so fascinated by it. On that note, do you need an assistant? I think I answered a similar question here
I haven't learned everything there is to learn about it yet but those are some examples.
How do I win at blackjack? I'm not sure. I'm more of a slots player myself. I'm terrible at blackjack.
Where does your tribe get the money from? Most of it comes from our casino but we also have other enterprises. We have a market and deli, smoke shop, bingo hall, lodge and spa, etc.
Will the tribe members now consider you an outsider elitist? I knew someone who left to get a degree and training in counseling and they considered her as an outsider because "she was too elitist to stay and now she's high and mighty." That's how it was for my father. He got into West Point and when he left the tribe rejected him; when he got there, the white people rejected him. But this was a long time ago... It's not too bad now. So far, I haven't gotten any negative reactions from tribal members.
I have multiple ancestry ties to the Cherokee tribe and have multiple family members on the Dawes roll. I have applied to be on the Dawes roll, how do you feel about outsiders joining the roll? I had no idea I had so much Native American ancestry until I started searching into the matter. Our tribe just put a new law in where more people can enroll; I think they changed the blood quantum necessary. I personally don't feel anything negative for new people enrolling. It can't hurt to expand our tribe. Good luck to you!
Do you speak a native American Language? I don't :( I think my dad does. Our tribe has a language but I only know a few words.
You should learn it, name it please, and make sure it does not die out. It's called "Wulshootseed" and I have some tapes. It's very guttural. I know I should learn it :/ a few young women are certified to teach it on our tribe so there's really no excuse.
How many people out of the tribe total speak it? And if you don't mind answering, why didn't you learn it growing up? I don't know the amount of people that speak it; the elders know it and a handful of the younger generation do. I went to our Tribal School until 2nd grade and then switched to public school. I know it was taught in Tribal School but I never got a firm enough grasp when I was there.
Does anyone write in it? A quick search seems to indicate the script is "Americanist phonetic notation", which seems to be Latin chars plus some combining marks, invented by Europeans. If people write in it, do they feel the script to be part of Native culture now? There is script but I haven't really seen people writing it. I have a blanket that has script on it with our tribal logo. I believe people feel that it is a part of our culture now but I'm unsure.
What would you like to tell people who don't understand Native culture, and are misinformed or ignorant on the subject? Are there any misconceptions that you'd like to clear up? After this, that I didn't get into college purely from affirmative action lol.
I wish you the best of luck in school. But really, that being Native doesn't mean the government gives us money. It's quite the opposite actually. We get our money from tribal owned businesses. And other tribes weren't lucky enough to receive land that could be developed. Some reservations are compared to Third World countries.
How do you personally feel about affirmative action? I think it has run its course. I think it was valuable to have for X amount of years but we don't particularly need it. I know people think I got into Hopkins simply because I'm Native but I worked my ass off to get here and everyone else should too.
Shouldn't you be outlining right now? ;) As in doing work? Yeah... I have a lot of finals to study for :/
Do you think you earned your scholarship academically or got it because you are Native American? I have my scholarship because of the tribe I belong to. Muckleshoot offers them to every tribal member. If it was from a different source I could claim it was academic. Our tribe requires a 2.0 GPA to keep our scholarships which is straight Cs so... not all that harsh. However, I'm currently attending Johns Hopkins so I'm a far cry from nonacademic.
Do you have a tribal tattoo? I don't haha. Not yet at least...
Since your studying law, have there been any examples where a "genetically predisposed" argument has been used to defend a Native American with an alcohol related crime? And was it successful? I don't believe there have been any cases like this... but I wouldn't know for sure. It would be really stupid if there were (I mean I get it but excuses are stupid).
Did you grow up on your "rez" or off? I grew up on my reservation. The only time I've been off is the last 4 years during college.
What are your thoughts of John Redcorn? Haha you asked this twice. I don't watch King of the Hill anymore and don't really remember the character. I don't find Hollywood's portrayal offensive to the point that I rally against it. I know that almost all of the portrayals are wrong and I started watching a documentary about it... but I just don't bother with being too offended.
Thanks for answering my somewhat cheekish question! If you have any questions regarding law school please feel free to ask. I'll do my best to talk you out of it :) Haha the attorney's on the tribe ask me every year, "Are you sure you want to go still?"
I am so embarrassed about some of the stupidity on this thread. That's awesome that you are working so hard. I remember being really embarrassed and astounded by the misinformation about Native Americans in public school. I thought the book "Lakota Woman" was an amazing read about the second occupation of Wounded Knee. Do you have any other suggested reading about Native American life in modern America? Sherman Alexie is a rather good Native author of books about his life growing up; they are fiction but I think a lot of it reflects his real life. I've only read a few but there was a movie on one too: Smoke Signals.
Also, as a lawyer for your tribe what kind of legal issues are you expecting to face, and what inspired you to become a lawyer? And, I've been interning in our attorney's office during the Summers. Our court is just now expanding to deal with civil and criminal law (before it was just family law - ICW cases and whatnot). I think by the time I take the bar exam I'll be coming back to an expanded court system. I think there'll be a lot of legal jargon that needs to be continually revised as the years to on; contracts with the state, jails, and police... etc. I've also helped in some business deals for the tribe as well. I think just knowing that I could do something for my tribe (since they're paying for my education but also because it's my life and will be my kids' lives as well) is awesome. So far there are no tribal members in our attorney's office and I think it's time we had at least one of us working there in that position.
I have been under the understanding that Native Americans of a certain purity (something like 1/16th?), that can prove their heritage, get free higher education. That's how a friend of mine got his. I've never heard of that... but I don't know everything. I go to JHU and it's a private university. I'm betting they don't pay for certain Universities but again... I don't know. My tribe pays for mine specifically.
What are your thoughts on Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl (and ICWA in general)? I didn't follow the case of Baby Veronica but someone asked about it earlier in the thread. I think she was a minuscule amount of Native but it ended up being a huge deal anyway...
Well in general, I support our ICW system because they try realllyyy hard. BUT, and this is just me personally nothing reflecting my tribe, I think it's impossible to keep all of our foster children on the reservation. I think they do a helluva lot better job presently but in the past it would have been valuable to look outside of the res. Our ICW was understaffed and overworked and kids went forgotten. And those kids aren't doing so well these days.
Is paint huffing included in the drug problem? No, it isn't. It's mostly prescription pills.
What do you think of anthropologists? In what way? They are certainly valuable. Forensic anthropology interests me most out of all of the fields. However, anthro itself is important.
Who's got the worst reputation in aboriginal affairs presently, Canada or the USA? If there's even a difference.. I'm honestly not sure. From what I've learned in this AMA I'd say Canada because it seems like their government still holds their land (in trust at least).
How is thanksgiving handled on a reservation? On ours, we celebrate like any other family :)
You look like the average white person, does it offend anyone when you say you are a native or half native? Well, there aren't a lot of people to offend. I've only met one other Native person here at Hopkins and I believe he was 1/4 (also appeared white).
In kindergarten all of the native kids got out of class got to go to the library, eat pizza and take a book of their choice. why didnt i? Wait, why didn't I get to do that?
Work for a casino. True... the house always wins.
What is a Native Reservation like today... I am asking this because I have never seen one... except on a static map. It differs across regions. Some tribes were very unlucky and received desert land. Those reservations live in complete poverty. They had nothing to do with their land; our reservation was lucky though and we got land that could be developed.
There is a large drug problem on the reservation so some places look really... impoverished. The people who do drugs become desperate and they steal in order to feed their addiction. They'll do whatever it takes to get their fix even if it means stealing from their own family. It sucks and I hope we can overcome the drugs, or at least to a point where so much of the community isn't doing it.
That's awesome. But, all Indians have a full ride. I don't think that's true... and if it is, then please point me to the grant/scholarship website for all natives. My scholarship comes specifically from our tribe. I didn't know of others but it'd be nice to educate myself.
I'm sure the government is the one actually paying. Gamblers are technically paying.
RIP Reddit. If you need me i'll be reading a wiki on her people, since this will be 99% jokes and 1% useless information. Haha well it's been 4 hours and there haven't been jokes so far.
Will you accept firewater and cornmeal as currency? What's firewater?
In personal dealing I might but that says nothing for my tribe. I'm partial to cornmeal though.
We were here first... I'd say we are pretty entitled for an education just as much as anyone else. I also have to say How would you Grade your stupidity and ignorance from 1 to 10 over the rest of your family ? He's a troll. If you look at his comment history it shows that he pretty much goes on threads and tries to piss people off.
Why do you feel entitled to college over a more qualified white man? Isn't this the definition of racism? Where did it come across that I felt entitled to college?
Last updated: 2013-12-04 04:31 UTC
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